Printing Industries Alliance – Long Island Shows Them the Money with Program on Sources of Business Financing

PIA-LI-finance-meeting.011415From left, speakers Richard Amsterdam, Thomas E. Dolan, Keith Lawlor, and Nicholas Terzulli, with Printing Industries Alliance – Long Island program organizers Greg Demetriou, Richard Schielke, and Bill Dirzulaitis

Smart printers never leave money on the table. The trick, though, is knowing where all the tables are. That’s no easy task when it comes to locating sources of public and private funding for business development, especially in the high-cost environment of Long Island.

The Long Island branch of Printing Industries Alliance made the search a little easier for members who attended its recent winter meeting on the theme of “Where’s the Money?” and how to go about obtaining it. As the guest speakers, a banker and three representatives of local government agencies said that financial assistance is available to printers willing to ask for it and able to work with providers that want to help.

The Babylon Industrial Development Agency, for example, lends a hand by doing whatever it can to make it easier for businesses to relocate to or grow within the town’s boundaries. Resources include fast-track bureaucratic approvals, tax abatements and extensions, and tax-exempt bonds. Thomas E. Dolan, a senior project manager for the agency, urged printers in Babylon or those thinking of setting up shop there to contact his office whenever they plan capital improvements or other kinds of expansion.

According to Keith Lawlor, a vice president for TD Bank, “there’s free money out there” for business development because of declining interest rates on commercial rates on commercial loans. Banks have to compensate by stepping up their lending volume. That’s good news for would-be borrowers, said Lawlor, but it also means closer scrutiny by the banks of the qualifications of loan applicants—even customers who have been doing business with their banks for decades.

Bank financing usually is the key to one company’s acquiring another, and on Long Island, said Lawlor, the pace of mergers and acquisitions has been brisk. The type of M&A lending that banks prefer is the arrangement in which the seller partially finances the transaction by holding a note of repayment, leaving the bank to provide the rest of the funding to the buyer. He said that selling printers should be realistic about what they can expect in terms of multiple of EBITDA, a calculation that determines the selling price. (EBITDA stands for earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization. Desirable companies have high EBITDA multiples; less attractive companies, smaller ones.)

Lawlor urged printers to get their financials in order now, even if they are not yet at the point of applying for a loan. “It’s all about what’s on paper,” he said, explaining that applicants must be prepared to document their ability to repay what they borrow. The most challenging loans to finance, he said, are those for working capital in which the collateral is the borrower’s accounts receivable—a volatile asset that can be hard for banks to base decisions on.

The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) doesn’t make loans for working capital, but it does provide lending for fixed-asset acquisition through The 504 Company—a not-for-profit corporation it established in 1981 to administer the SBA 504 Loan Program in New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Coordinating it for the three states is the New York Business Development Corporation (NYBDC), represented at the PIA-LI meeting by Richard Amsterdam, its vice president.

Through the 504 program, he said, NYBDC can provide 40% percent of the fixed-rate loan amount in partnership with a bank that finances most of the remainder. All business sectors except the adult and gaming industries are eligible for loans that can range from $50,000 to $5 million.

The idea is to enable businesses to acquire fixed assets while retaining the working capital they need for growth and job creation. Amsterdam said the program recently worked well for a printer who obtained $4.3 million in financing to buy and install a new offset press using the invoice value of the machine as collateral. Processing and approval of 504 program loans, he said, takes only about 30 days on SBA’s end—the same as the bank.

High taxes on businesses, acknowledged Nicholas Terzulli, director of business development for the Nassau County Industrial Development Agency, represent the “biggest barrier to growth and entry in Nassau County—hands down.” He said that while his agency can’t necessarily lower the rates that businesses pay, it can help to protect owners against increases while making sure that they are taking advantage of all of the incentive programs available to them.

These include real estate, sales, and use tax exemptions; mortgage recording tax abatements; and financing through tax-exempt and taxable bonds. The agency’s Local Enterprise Assistance and Development Service (LEADS) program provides direct financial assistance and other kinds of help to the county’s small and mid-sized businesses.

Nassau’s IDA coordinates its efforts with those of state agencies and local utilities, connecting businesses with these entities to break logjams and move projects forward. On Long Island, said Terzulli, “everybody loves to work together on economic development” regardless of the turf or the politics involved.

Among Nassau IDA’s recent successes, he said, is the decision by automotive retailing software developer DealerTrack to build a $150 million campus in Lake Success following 18 months of negotiations with the county to craft a package of incentives. On a smaller scale, the IDA worked with a technology company that wanted to move from the South Bronx to a safer haven on Long Island. Taking part in the conversation that sealed the deal, Terzulli said, was the chief of police of Plainview, where the company now is located.

Mark R. Hahn Forms
 Graphic Arts Advisors, LLC

022815.mark-hahn-forms-gaaMark R. Hahn has announced the formation of Graphic Arts Advisors, LLC, headquartered in Mountain Lakes, NJ with an additional office in Dallas, TX.

Graphic Arts Advisors, LLC is a boutique strategic financial advisory and consulting firm focused exclusively on the printing, packaging and related industries. The firm provides financial advisory services to clients with both mergers and acquisitions (M&A) and capital transactional needs of up to $100 million and consulting services related to valuations, corporate restructuring and turnarounds, and strategic shareholder advisory services.

In establishing GAA, Hahn noted, “Now more than ever and especially in the dynamic and ever changing marketplace in which companies in the graphic arts and related industries now operate, they need a trusted financial advisory firm working with them and on their behalf that is exclusively focused on their industry in order to build or monetize shareholder value.”

Prior to founding GAA, Hahn served as Senior Vice President of NAPL’s Business Advisory Group with primary responsibility for the group’s M&A practice. Before joining NAPL, he held several senior management positions at a diversified graphic services company, most recently as CFO/COO and Corporate Development Officer. Hahn previously served as a Managing Director of Brownstein Corporation, a nationally recognized financial advisory firm.

He is regularly quoted and published in several printing industry trade and management journals; and through his monthly blog, The Target Report, Hahn provides the printing, packaging and related industries with a high level overview of industry trends and a central source of information where owners, investors, lenders and other professionals can view information about the latest mergers, acquisitions and restructuring in the printing industry, broadly defined.

Graphic Arts Advisors, LLC is a boutique strategic financial advisory and consulting firm focused exclusively on the printing, packaging and related industries serving clients with revenues of between $5 and $100 million and transactional needs of up to $100 million. Additional information can be found on the company’s website.

Scholarship Fund’s Holiday Bash Raises Spirits and Money on Behalf of Graphics Education

122214.gcsf_holiday_bash.1Nearly 300 industry members mixed and mingled at The Art Directors Club during the GCSF holiday bash.

The mood couldn’t have been more festive, the setting more sophisticated, or the cause more worthy as nearly 300 members of the industry gathered at the Manhattan gallery of The Art Directors Club to celebrate the both the holidays and the outstanding work of the Graphic Communications Scholarship Foundation (GCSF).

The December 11 event was notable not only as a social get-together, but also as a revival of camaraderie among groups and clubs that continue to represent graphics professionals in the New York City metro area. Six organizations joined in supporting the holiday bash, while numerous individual friends of the industry contributed time, cash, and gifts to help make the evening a success. Veterans who remember the industry’s annual rounds of Christmastime banquets and parties of 20 to 30 years ago heard many echoes of those much-missed affairs in the clink of glasses and the buzz of conversation at the gala for GCSF.

To those who attended, the scholarship fund needed no introduction as the metro area’s leading source of stipends for young people taking academic degrees in graphic communications and related disciplines.

A 100% volunteer organization that operates without professional staff or overhead expense, GCSF has distributed a total of $416,000 in scholarships to 116 students of graphic design and production since the fund’s inception in 2002. The not-for-profit 501(c)3 corporation acts as a coordinator for a large number of individual scholarship funds and gives all of the money collected through them to students attending or bound for colleges and universities with degree programs in graphic studies.

122214.gcsf_holiday_bash.2Not-so-secret Santa David Luke, a past president of the scholarship fund, emcees with the help of its current president, Jerry Mandelbaum.

Although scholarship recipients can use their stipends at any school with a recognized graphics studies program, GCSF’s hope is that most of them will bring what they learn back to the metro area by pursuing their careers here. To encourage this, GCSF has established a one-to-one mentoring program that pairs students with industry pros for 12 months at a minimum of two contact hours per month. Fifteen students currently are taking advantage of this structured opportunity to gain hands-on experience in graphics-related career fields.

GCSF’s annual scholarship awards presentation ceremony is a high point on the industry’s calendar of events. The tentative hold date for the 13th Annual GCSF Scholarship Awards Celebration and Ceremony at the Hearst Tower is Thursday, June 18, 2015. About a year and a half ago, the fund’s governing committee also began to talk about a year-end celebration to raise additional awareness for the fund and to give the industry in the metro area a new focal point for its still-vigorous fraternal spirit.

The result was the December 11 bash, which included, besides GCSF and the The Art Directors Club, the participation of Printing Industries Alliance, The Advertising Production Club of New York (APC-NY), IDEAlliance, and The Navigators (a club well remembered by many for its Service to Industry Award program). The evening also featured the inauguration of memorial scholarships in the names of industry figures Nina Wintringham and Steve Server, as well as a toy drive on behalf of the Harlem Children’s Zone. (So many toys were donated that some of them were sent to Schneider Children’s Hospital as well as to the Harlem organization.)

Richard Krasner, a past president of the fund and one of the event’s lead organizers, said that the joint support of the groups drove a turnout that enabled GCSF to cover the costs of the party at a ticket price of just $25. According to Krasner, more than a third of those who attended gave cash donations over and above the ticket price. Hearst and Time Inc. helped by buying blocks of tickets for employees.

Jerry Mandelbaum, GCSF’s current president, said that although fundraising wasn’t the primary reason for the holiday bash, the event pulled in almost $15,000 for scholarships from net proceeds, tickets and raffles, and group and individual contributions and donations.

122214.gcsf_holiday_bash.3GCSF stuffed a few holiday stockings with the help of a Chinese auction led by (from left) David Garcia, David Luke, Nick Patrissi, Diane Romano, Paul Nicholson, and Jerry Mandelbaum.

Krasner said GCSF hopes that the financial and social success of the holiday bash will turn it into a “legacy evening” that the industry can use as an occasion for celebration and good fellowship in years to come. A date for the 2015 edition of the event will be announced.

In the aftermath of any affair that comes off as happily as GCSF’s first holiday bash, thanks and recognition are due in abundance. GCSF gave a special shout-out to Olga Grisaitis and Hugo Verdeguer of The Art Directors Club for their help in making the first-floor space at the gallery on West 29th Street available for the party. Also thanked were those who contributed gifts for a fund-raising Chinese auction: Hallie Satz (Highroad Press), Paul Nicholson (Showtime), Diane Romano (Hudson Yards), David Garcia (LB Graph-X), and Ellen Hurwitch (RedTie Ltd.). Howard Weinstein got credit for sending personnel from Candid Litho to assist with setup and cleanup.

122214.gcsf_holiday_bash.4GCSF officers and trustees, from left: Jack Kott, Jerry Mandelbaum, Jessie Ann Murphy (also a GCSF scholarship recipient), David Luke, Diane Romano, Nick Patrissi, David Garcia, and Mark Darlow.

The planning committee for the holiday bash included Richard Krasner, Diane Romano, Ellen Hurwitch, and Mark Darlow. The current slate of GCSF officers includes Jerry Mandelbaum, president; Ellen Faith Hurwitch, vice president; Diane Romano, vice president; Steve Kennedy, treasurer; Nick Patrissi, secretary; and David Luke, immediate past president.

Our thanks and congratulations to everyone concerned for a swell affair and an uplifting reminder of the philanthropic unity of spirit that has always been our industry’s most distinguishing characteristic.

Printing Industries Alliance Appoints Marty Maloney as Executive Vice President (announcement with commentary)

marty_maloneyPrinting Industries Alliance, the trade organization dedicated to supporting the success of the New York State, northern New Jersey, and northwestern Pennsylvania graphic communications industry, announced the appointment of Martin J. Maloney as its Executive Vice President, effective on December 1, 2014.  Maloney, whose graphic communications career spans 40 years, brings a wealth of experience and knowledge in every facet of the graphic communications business to the position.

Timothy Freeman, President of the Printing Industries Alliance, stated, “We are very happy to have Marty Maloney on board. His vast printing experience and skill set will be immediately utilized in several areas, including membership, marketing, events and more.  His strong voice in support of the printing industry has been heard for many years, and we now look forward to his staunch support of the Printing Industries Alliance.”

Maloney commented, “Over the years I have promoted several printers, large and small, and many of the world’s largest suppliers to graphic arts industry. Now I am taking that experience and applying it to the industry at large in perhaps its most important market.  I am very pleased to be given this important opportunity.”

Maloney is currently Chairman of Broadford & Maloney Inc. (BMI), a full-service marketing, public relations, and advertising firm dedicated to serving the needs of the graphic communications industry. Starting in December, BMI is transitioning to a public relations and marketing consultancy that will serve only a few select clients.

In the last two decades, BMI’s long-term clients included HP Indigo, The New York Times, Xerox, DuPont, Procter & Gamble, Polaroid, Agfa and many more. Also served were hundreds of printers from RR Donnelley to the corner digital print shop. Before starting his own firm, Maloney was Chief Marketing Officer for Arcata, where he served on the LBO team to facilitate the nation’s first billion-dollar leveraged buyout. Previously he was Vice President, Marketing for the Graphics Division of John Blair & Company, which had 14 printing, mailing and marketing companies including Meehan-Tooker and Alden Press.

Concurrently with BMI he was a Board Director for Cenveo, a $2 billion printing firm with 90 plants. In this role, he served as Lead Director, Chair of Corporate Governance and sat on the Audit, Compensation and Search committees. He also was a founder and first Executive Director of The Print Council, an advocacy organization for the printing industry. On the legislative side he was Chairman of a 6,000-member PAC and served on the Finance Committee for a six-term Congressman.

Maloney is a longtime member of the Advisory Board of the department of Strategic Communications, Marketing, and Media Management (SCM3), part of New York University’s School of Professional Studies.  He recently concluded a three-year term as Board Chair.  SCM3 includes the master’s degree program in Graphic Communications Management and Technology, in which Maloney teaches graduate courses as an adjunct professor.  Maloney is also a 20-year member of the Franklin Committee and was a four-time chairman of the event; he continues to serve on the Franklin Luminaire Committee. Maloney is a frequent speaker at industry functions.

Maloney will work from the newly established New York City satellite office of the Printing Industries Alliance in Park Slope, Brooklyn, in the exact center of the five boroughs and also equidistant from Long Island, northern New Jersey, western Pennsylvania, and New York’s Westchester County.  The office is located at 195 Prospect Park West, Suite 1A, Brooklyn, NY 11215. The office number is 718-499-0401.  Maloney’s direct dial and cell number is 203-912-0804. He can be reached via email at m.maloney@bmcorp.com or mmaloney@pialliance.org.

About Printing Industries Alliance
Printing Industries Alliance provides a variety of consultative, informational, and cost saving services to support its members’ success and to provide a significant ROI on their dues investment.  In addition, the organization provides industry representation to a variety of governmental entities at the local, state, and federal levels. Printing Industries Alliance is a regional affiliate of Printing Industries of America and is headquartered in Amherst, NY.

For further information contact:
Timothy Freeman
President
Printing Industries Alliance
716-691-321 / tfreeman@pialliance.org

Commentary: Marty’s impressive list of career achievements speaks for itself. But, what the announcement may not convey to those who don’t know him personally is the depth of his charismatic and inspirational leadership style. I’ve enjoyed the pleasure and the privilege of his acquaintance for many years, and, speaking also as a member of Printing Industries Alliance, can say that I’ve never seen a better match of personality to position than the one that underlies Marty’s acceptance of this important job. In recruiting Marty, Tim Freeman has picked someone fully capable of sustaining the exemplary tradition of industry service established by Vicki Keenan, Marty’s predecessor in the role. The fact that he’ll be representing the association from a home base in Brooklyn means that at long last, NYC-metro printers will have a resident spokesperson and a problem-solver for the five boroughs in their midst once more. Here’s wishing Marty all the best, and here’s a salute to Printing Industries Alliance for a brilliant choice on behalf of its members everywhere.

—Pat Henry

 

Joel Quadracci of Quad / Graphics Keynotes at PRIMEX East Conference in New York City

PH & JOEL QUADRACCI @ PRIMEX EAST.081314 Joel Quadracci (right) is interviewed by Patrick Henry at PRIMEX East.

On June 19, 2014, I had the privilege of interviewing Joel Quadracci, chairman, president, and CEO of Quad / Graphics Inc., in his keynote presentation at PRIMEX East, a leadership conference in New York City sponsored by IDEAlliance, Quad, and other industry partners. Answering my questions on behalf of WhatTheyThink, and fielding numerous additional questions from the audience, Quadracci covered a wide range of subjects relating to the state of the industry and Quad’s role in it. IDEAlliance has now posted the video recording of the nearly hour-long interview along with recordings of most of the other PRIMEX East sessions. These include remarks on the outlook for the U.S. Postal Service by its Postmaster General, Patrick R. Donahoe; and a report on the continuing turmoil in the periodical distribution industry by a leading authority in the field, John Harrington of Harrington Associates.

Canon Hosts Printing Industries Alliance in First Tour of Its New Corporate Headquarters on LI

pialliance_visits_canon.031314.1 When Canon U.S.A. Inc. opened its new corporate headquarters in Melville, NY, last year, it invited printers to use the facility’s elaborate showroom and demo center as a learning resource. On March 13, the Long Island division of Printing Industries Alliance (PIAlliance) became the first industry group to take Canon up on its offer by bringing more than 40 members to the site for a guided tour.

The 12,000-square-foot showroom is the centerpiece of a 700,000-square foot-building designed to promote Canon’s corporate philosophies as well as its technologies and products. Canon executives briefed the visitors on the layout and construction of the building, emphasizing the great lengths to which Canon has gone in order to make it sustainable and environmentally friendly. Product briefings followed, including overviews of some of Canon’s most advanced systems for production digital printing.

“Kyosei” is a Japanese word for the idea of living and working harmoniously—a concept that Canon says it strives to honor both as a profit-making business and as a responsible member of the communities where it operates. Environmental responsibility at all stages of the life cycle is paramount, and the headquarters building, the visitors were told, has been engineered to be as environmentally friendly 100 years from now as it is today.

Among the steps taken toward that goal was laying out the building in a way that permits 75% of it to receive natural light—an architectural strategy that cuts consumption of electricity. The structure has no indoor thermostats, relying instead on external sensors that modify the interior climate according to changes in temperature outside. Benches on the property’s park-like, 52-acre campus—formerly a pumpkin patch off Route 110—are made of recycled toner cartridges.

pialliance_visits_canon.031314.2Dennis Amorosano, vice president of the marketing division of Canon’s business information and imaging solutions group, gave the visitors a corporate overview of a $35.5 billion supplier of consumer, B2B, and industrial imaging technologies that employs more than 194,000 people worldwide. Amorosano said that Canon invested a sum equal to more than 8% percent of last year’s net sales in R&D and received 3,825 U.S. patents, making it the third-largest holder of U.S. patents in 2013.

The company had $2.2 billion in net income last year. 2013 also saw the completion of Canon’s integration of Océ, a digital print systems manufacturer it acquired in 2009. Frances Cicogna, commercial print segment manager, said that the Canon-Océ combination represents the industry’s broadest portfolio of solutions for cut-sheet and continuous production printing in color and black and white. In 2012, she said, Canon and Océ equipment produced 68 billion digital pages—about 20% of all digital pages output in the U.S.

Although the tour of the showroom focused mostly on production systems and workflow, it also familiarized the PIAlliance visitors with Canon’s extensive lines of consumer cameras and personal imaging products. The exhibit space—equal parts library, museum, and machine demo room—features numerous hands-on product stations and interactive displays that trace Canon’s history from its founding in the 1930s.

The showroom also houses examples of Canon technologies that are not well known to the general public, such as devices for medical exams and a “mixed reality” imaging system that can inject computer-generated graphics into real-time views of the physical world.

The Canon visit was one of a number of activities scheduled this year by PIAlliance’s Long Island chapter, which is chaired by Richard Schielke. Upcoming are a golf outing, a fishing trip, and a town hall-style meeting for members in May.

Printing Industries Alliance is a regional affiliate of Printing Industries of America (PIA), the national trade association for the graphic communications industry. Printing Industries Alliance represents graphics firms in New York State, northern New Jersey and northwestern Pennsylvania.

pialliance_visits_canon.031314.3

Zenger Group Prepares for Productive Future with Speedmaster XL 106 Perfector from Heidelberg

030514.zengerboncraftFrom left, Zenger Group owners John Zenger, Joe Zenger, and Steve Zenger.

Zenger Group, Inc. reports the installation of a Heidelberg Speedmaster XL 106 eight-color perfector with Prinect Axis Control at its new corporate headquarters and plant in Tonawanda, NY. The new press takes the place of an early-generation Speedmaster XL 105 at the Zenger Group’s Orchard Park, NY facility, one of three plants to be consolidated into the new facility.

“We wanted the fastest, most productive, most reliable full-size press available to serve as the centerpiece of our sheetfed operation at the new facility,” said Steve Zenger, president and CEO. “Heidelberg presses are the benchmark in terms of production speed, output, and print stability throughout the industry.”

Capable of production speeds up to 18,000 sph in straight or perfecting mode, and with effective quality assurance via the Prinect Axis Control color measurement system, the new Speedmaster XL 106 will significantly increase Zenger Group’s capacity and broaden the scope of its manufacturing capabilities. Central control of the pressroom is managed via Prinect Pressroom Manager.

Zenger Group has been a leader and an innovative force in the western New York’s printing industry for more than 30 years.

DG3 Blasts Off into High-Volume Personalization with the Debut of Its HP T230 Color Inkjet Web Press

022714.DG3.HPT230.1On February 27, with rocket ship imagery and the acrobatics of a pair of glittering aerialists as the backdrop, the Diversified Global Graphics Group (DG3, Jersey City, NJ) launched an HP T230 color inkjet web press into an orbit it hopes to fill with richly colored variable print.

There to celebrate the liftoff were about 100 customers who now can add high-volume digital web printing to the array of services they buy from DG3, one of the top providers print and visual communication products in the Northeast.

The press, installed last November and put through its first full-scale production run a few weeks ago, is DG3’s latest investment in technologies aimed at broadening the range of the digital and conventional marketing resources it offers to a high-end business clientele.

“For me, it’s about custom communication,” said Thomas Saggiomo, president and CEO of the $150 million company. With the HP T230 in place, he said, “the challenge is to get clients to think creatively” about how it can help them personalize the ways they communicate with their customers via direct mail, marketing collateral, documents, and other kinds of work the press will be used to manufacture.

022714.DG3.HPT230.2Thomas Saggiomo, president and CEO, Diversified Global Graphics Group (DG3)

The HP T230 is the new centerpiece of a digital pressroom that also features a pair of cut-sheet HP Indigo six-color devices. Connected to the web press are finishing units for inline perforating, scoring, and cutting—key assets for achieving the kind of high-speed, high-volume integrated workflow that is essential for ROI with a press of this capacity. Close by are additional resources for post processing, including saddlestitching and perfect binding.

The HP T230 is the enhanced-output version of the HP T200, one of three T-series color inkjet web platforms available from HP. Designed to run a 22″ web (20.5″ image area) at speeds up to 400 feet per minute in duplexed mono or full color, the press can print with full variability on standard uncoated offset web stocks and compatible coated media. The ink set is CMYK, augmented by a liquid bonding agent that improves ink appearance and durability when uncoated stocks are used.

All of these performance features came into play in the production of the HP T230’s first job for DG3, a 650,000-piece run for a healthcare provider in which every copy contained unique data. Guests at the launch party got a smaller-scale but no less personalized demonstration of what the press can do in printed keepsakes that displayed their faces, photographed when they arrived, in three different formats on the cut and perfed sheet.

Joseph Lindfeldt, DG3’s executive vice president for corporate development, said that the HP T230 would go a long way toward helping customers achieve “collateral virtualization”: DG3’s term for print-on-demand workflows that eliminate the need to over-run and stockpile printed matter. The ability of the press to print variably in whatever quantity and on whatever schedule the customer wishes will “make fulfillment extinct as it relates to print collateral,” Lindfeldt said.

The high-volume capacity of the web press—HP puts its duty cycle at 50 million letter-sized impressions per month—also enables it to achieve production economies in personalized long runs that cut-sheet digital presses can’t match, according to Lindfeldt.

“This widens the gamut of print on demand,” he said.

Although DG3’s enthusiasm for its HP T230 is intense, the passion wasn’t kindled overnight. Lindfeldt said that before the purchase finally was announced at Print 13, he and other DG3 personnel had spent “a year and a half in a room with HP” making certain that the press would be the right platform for the customized solutions that DG3 offers to healthcare and insurance companies,  pharmaceutical manufacturers, advertising agencies, and other corporate customers.

Now the priority for DG3 is to fill “the big gap” that exists in the way some of these customers think about personalized digital printing and the data management issues that go along with it, Lindfeldt said.

022714.DG3.HPT230.3
Also on hand for the launch was Aurelio Maruggi, HP’s vice president and general manager, who noted that other T-series customers have been successful with the same applications that DG3 plans to run on its HP T230. He said that one of every three color digital web presses currently sold by HP goes to a printer who already has one or more of the machines. Repeat customers know that the flexibility high-speed inkjet web printing gives them will be essential to keeping up with changing print market demands, according to Maruggi.

As DG3’s director of digital operations, Larry Durso shepherded the HP T230 from initial setup to readiness for full production. He praised the press for its ability to handle a wide range of stock weights with full ink coverage at or near full rated speed. The press is crewed by two operators who also tend the inline finishing equipment while runs are in progress, Durso said.

The HP T230 takes its place in a general production environment where high-speed, high volume-printing is routine. In addition to its digital printers, DG3 has one of the largest concentrations of offset litho equipment in the tristate metro area, including two eight-color and two six-color sheetfed presses and six webs. The company also has extensive capabilities for binding, finishing, mailing, and fulfillment.

Transitioning from offset to digital printing was not a factor in the decision to install the HP T230, Saggiomo said.

Prospect Printing Adds Digital Capacity with Linoprint 751 from Heidelberg

022714.prospectprinting

From left: Dan Dibble, Angela Halloran, Matt Pryor, Michele Muccino, Mark Deloia (owner), Anthony Bracco (owner), Mike Ambrose (owner), Frank Segui, and Daryl Canuzzi.

Prospect Printing, LLC (Prospect, CT) has installed a Linoprint C751 with inline bookletmaker from Heidelberg to take advantage of higher margins on the short-run and variable data jobs it hopes to attract, based on the new machine’s fast turnaround and less expensive setup capabilities. “Being able to say ‘yes’ with confidence to short-run, quick-turn job requests alleviates a lot of stress for us,” said Anthony Bracco, a founding partner of the business. “Plus, our operators love it.”

Already running static jobs from one to 1,500 sheets on the new digital press, the company is quickly ramping up its variable data expertise. With annual sales in the $2.3 million range, Prospect Printing serves customers throughout the Northeast. The Linoprint C751 is the company’s first digital machine.

 

Ryan Printing Moves from 29″ to 40″ Production by Installing a Speedmaster CX 102

022614.RYAN_PRINTINGAl Ryan, president of Blauvelt Printing, at the company’s new Heidelberg Speedmaster CX 102 offset press.

The installation of a five-color Heidelberg Speedmaster CX 102 press with Inpress Control, aqueous coater, and extended delivery earlier this month marked a watershed moment for Ryan Printing (Blauvelt, NY). The new press heralds the one-shift operation’s transition from a half- to a full-size shop with competitive firepower to spare.

“Before the installation, we were thinking of adding a second shift based on rising volume, but the speed (16,500 sph) and productivity of the CX 102 has made that unnecessary,” said Al Ryan, president. “We’ll be sticking with a five-day, single-shift operation with occasional weekend work. We’re confident we’ll be able to compete effectively by doing what we’ve always done: expanding our capabilities, extending our print market with the 40″ press, and providing great customer service.”

Ryan said that the new Speedmaster CX 102, which takes the place of a five-color, 29” Speedmaster CD 74, had its work cut out from the moment it went online. “We already had enough work for it, so keeping it busy isn’t a problem.”

At the same time, he said, “we’ve realized savings on the order of 50% to 70%, thanks to the Prinect Inpress Control inline closed-loop color management system which drives down our makeready time to 10 minutes, enables us to get to precise LAB matching color in under 200 sheets, and substantially reduces our consumption of ink and paper. Our bindery operations have been streamlined by being able to cut larger sheets of printed material and folding larger signatures.”

Thanks also to the cartridge-based InkStar ink supply, the company enjoys the benefits of fully automated ink feeding and reduced startup times by eliminating the need to skin ink cans prior to filling the fountain. The additional benefits of less wasted ink and continuous monitoring of ink levels through the Prinect Press Center Console ensure the highest quality without sacrificing the ability to change inks flexibly.

The addition of the Speedmaster CX 102 also will enable Ryan Printing to expand its packaging business. Not only will the company gain tremendous flexibility in handling substrates from lightweight paper to 40-pt. board stock, but Prinect Inpress Control will keep brand colors consistent and reduce waste to a minimum, advancing the company to a higher level of production capability.

“We’ve always manufactured some packaging materials like boxes, bottle-neckers, and window signage,” Ryan said, “but we are now into it seriously and consider folding cartons a strong growth area. The Speedmaster CX 102 is a robust, flexible press for the wide variety of high-quality commercial and packaging printing jobs our customers demand.”

In choosing the Speedmaster CX 102, Ryan Printing also has strengthened its commitment to environmental protection, based on the low energy usage, resource efficiency, and long service life that make the Speedmaster CX 102 the most environmentally friendly press in its class.

The CX 102 is ideal for reduced-alcohol and alcohol-free printing, while color measuring systems such as Prinect Inpress Control reduce paper waste on average by 200 up to 400 sheets per print job and lower the level of CO2 emissions. In addition, environmentally friendly cloth blanket wash-up devices use water and solvent to reduce the overall amount of solvent used, yielding savings of up to 90%.

Citing double-digit revenue growth from year-to-year and $7.5 million in current annual sales, Al Ryan attributes his company’s 20-year record of industry-leading service and quality to a combination of smart investment and top-notch customer service. “We give our customers what they want, when they want it,” Ryan said. “People are happy with us, and that yields more work for us as we add capabilities.”