NYC’s Young Graphics Talent To Be Showcased in Citywide Competition on June 5

On June 5, more than 100 students from 10 New York City high schools will assemble at New York City College of Technology (City Tech) in downtown Brooklyn for the metro area’s most important showcase of young talent in graphic communications: the 14th Annual Citywide Graphic Arts Competition.

The event, held under the auspices of the New York City Department of Education, challenges the contestants to conceive and execute their best work in seven categories on a tight, real-world production deadline. The judges are graphics educators and industry professionals. The awards include trophies, cash, gifts, and, for the first-place winners, a celebratory dinner and a tour of The New York Times plant in College Point, Queens.

The judging categories are for graphic, package, and web site design; photography; student filmmakers; digital video production; and digital illustration. On June 5, the contestants will have just four hours to research, design, and produce their projects on site for evaluation later in the day by the judges. While they work, the teachers who encouraged them to enter will attend briefings on industry trends and career paths for students of graphic communications.

The competition is open to all New York City public high school students participating in a graphic arts program. This year, entrants qualified as first-round and second-round finalists by pre-submitting work on the theme of “My City” for online judging by high school graphics teachers. The teachers used detailed rubrics based on professional standards of the graphics industry to assess the entries.

The finalists will receive new assignments to develop for the prize competition in the Atrium at City Tech, which is located at 300 Jay Street. This year, for the first time, alumni of the competition—graduates who were once finalists themselves— will award the trophies, cash and prizes to the winners.

Organizing and promoting the event is Graphics Industry Advisory Commission, a group of volunteers who work with the Department of Education to improve study programs in graphic communications at city high schools. The commission is one of a number of advisory groups under the umbrella of the department’s Office of Postsecondary Readiness (OSPR), which fosters public-private alliances in support of career-focused education.

Over the years, the competition has won the support of numerous graphics industry companies and organizations that donate prizes and provide other kinds of assistance. Additional contributions, however, are always welcome. Wanted this year, says Annette Bensen, chair of the advisory commission, are “products, publications, promo and collateral material, even fun gifts and tchotkes for the gift bags. The annual competition is one of the hallmarks of graphics education in New York, and it works because it is supported by the industry.”

Donors can call Bensen at 917-359-7569 or e-mail her at angen@comcast.net. The competition also has a PayPal link for those who wish to contribute online.

2015 Luminaire Award Recipients Will Be Honored on October 1 in New York City

041315_franklin_luminaireIDEAlliance and Printing Industries Alliance have announced the recipients of the 2015 Luminaire Awards recognizing outstanding professionals in advertising, publishing, printing, and integrated media.

The honorees are Charles Blanchard, Jr., president and CEO, Blanchard Systems, Inc.; Meghan Fitzgerald Milkowski, vice president, production and circulation, Prometheus Global Media; Veronica H. Simmons, vice president, director of print production, MRM/McCann; and Michael J. Simon, executive vice president, Publishers Press, Inc. The presentations will take place during the annual Franklin Luminaire Awards event on October 1, 2015 at The Lighthouse at Chelsea Piers, New York City.

The Luminaire Awards salute outstanding achievements by media production leaders In recognition of their positive influence, creative excellence, and personal dedication  to the graphic communications industry. Biographies of this year’s recipients can be found here.

The Franklin Luminaire Awards event is a yearly showcase of industry solidarity and fellowship throughout the metro region. Also to be honored on October 1 are the as-yet unnamed recipients of the 2015 Franklin Award for Distinguished Service and the 2015 Zenger Community Service Medal.

The Franklin Award for Distinguished Service is the single highest honor conferred by the metro New York graphic communications industry. In recognizing distinguished recipients for their positive roles in American society, the award serves to focus national attention on the depth and breadth of the industry. Past recipients include several U.S. presidents and a high-profile roster of statesmen, diplomats, military figures, and leaders in business and the arts.

A community service award honoring those who give back, the Zenger Medal hails a graphic communications professional for exceptional acts of service, courage, or activism that inspire others to make their communities better places to live.

A registration form for the 2015 Franklin Luminaire Awards event can be downloaded here. For information about sponsorship opportunities, contact Kim Tuzzo at Printing Industries Alliance: 800-777-4PIA (4742); kutzzo@PIAlliance.org.

Printing Industries Alliance is a trade association representing graphic communications firms and related businesses in New York State, northern New Jersey, and northwestern Pennsylvania. IDEAlliance is a not-for-profit association that identifies best practices for efficient end-to-end digital media workflows from content creation through distribution.

Graphic Communications Scholarship Foundation Brings Industry Leaders Together for First Annual Spring Fling

NEW YORK, NY, April 9, 2015 – The board of directors of the Graphic Communications Scholarship, Award and Career Advancement Foundation, Inc. (GCSF) is pleased to announce its first annual “Spring Fling” event.

The event promises to be the premier networking opportunity for meeting industry leaders as well as top scholarship recipients. All of the proceeds will go toward funding scholarships for New York and New Jersey metro area students interested in pursuing careers in graphic communications.

The Spring Fling will be held on Thursday, June 4 at 5:30 p.m. at Ogilvy & Mather’s rooftop venue located at 636 11th Avenue in Manhattan. It is a seasonal follow-up to GCSF’s highly successful “Holiday Bash,” a gala party held last December at the Art Directors Club in New York City.

Like the Holiday Bash, the Spring Fling get-together will be an industrywide event thanks to the participation of Printing Industries Alliance, The Advertising Production Club of New York (APC-NY), IDEAlliance, and The Navigators.

Jerry Mandelbaum is President of GCSF. Chairing the Spring Fling is Diane Romano, who may be contacted at diane@hyards.com.  For further information and tickets visit http://www.gcscholarships.org/springfling.

ABOUT GCSF
A 100% volunteer organization that operates without professional staff or overhead expense, GCSF has distributed a total of $416,000 in scholarships to 116 students of graphic design and communications since the fund’s inception in 2002.

The not-for-profit 501(c)3 corporation acts as a coordinator for a large number of individual scholarship funds. It gives all of the money collected through them to students attending or bound for colleges and universities with degree programs in graphic studies. GCSF also has established a one-to-one mentoring program that pairs students with industry pros for 12 months at a minimum of two contact hours per month.

GCSF’s annual scholarship awards presentation ceremony is a high point on the industry’s calendar of events. The date for the 13th Annual GCSF Scholarship Awards Celebration and Ceremony at the Hearst Tower is Thursday, June 18, 2015.

 

Printing Industries Alliance – Long Island Shows Them the Money with Program on Sources of Business Financing

PIA-LI-finance-meeting.011415From left, speakers Richard Amsterdam, Thomas E. Dolan, Keith Lawlor, and Nicholas Terzulli, with Printing Industries Alliance – Long Island program organizers Greg Demetriou, Richard Schielke, and Bill Dirzulaitis

Smart printers never leave money on the table. The trick, though, is knowing where all the tables are. That’s no easy task when it comes to locating sources of public and private funding for business development, especially in the high-cost environment of Long Island.

The Long Island branch of Printing Industries Alliance made the search a little easier for members who attended its recent winter meeting on the theme of “Where’s the Money?” and how to go about obtaining it. As the guest speakers, a banker and three representatives of local government agencies said that financial assistance is available to printers willing to ask for it and able to work with providers that want to help.

The Babylon Industrial Development Agency, for example, lends a hand by doing whatever it can to make it easier for businesses to relocate to or grow within the town’s boundaries. Resources include fast-track bureaucratic approvals, tax abatements and extensions, and tax-exempt bonds. Thomas E. Dolan, a senior project manager for the agency, urged printers in Babylon or those thinking of setting up shop there to contact his office whenever they plan capital improvements or other kinds of expansion.

According to Keith Lawlor, a vice president for TD Bank, “there’s free money out there” for business development because of declining interest rates on commercial rates on commercial loans. Banks have to compensate by stepping up their lending volume. That’s good news for would-be borrowers, said Lawlor, but it also means closer scrutiny by the banks of the qualifications of loan applicants—even customers who have been doing business with their banks for decades.

Bank financing usually is the key to one company’s acquiring another, and on Long Island, said Lawlor, the pace of mergers and acquisitions has been brisk. The type of M&A lending that banks prefer is the arrangement in which the seller partially finances the transaction by holding a note of repayment, leaving the bank to provide the rest of the funding to the buyer. He said that selling printers should be realistic about what they can expect in terms of multiple of EBITDA, a calculation that determines the selling price. (EBITDA stands for earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization. Desirable companies have high EBITDA multiples; less attractive companies, smaller ones.)

Lawlor urged printers to get their financials in order now, even if they are not yet at the point of applying for a loan. “It’s all about what’s on paper,” he said, explaining that applicants must be prepared to document their ability to repay what they borrow. The most challenging loans to finance, he said, are those for working capital in which the collateral is the borrower’s accounts receivable—a volatile asset that can be hard for banks to base decisions on.

The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) doesn’t make loans for working capital, but it does provide lending for fixed-asset acquisition through The 504 Company—a not-for-profit corporation it established in 1981 to administer the SBA 504 Loan Program in New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Coordinating it for the three states is the New York Business Development Corporation (NYBDC), represented at the PIA-LI meeting by Richard Amsterdam, its vice president.

Through the 504 program, he said, NYBDC can provide 40% percent of the fixed-rate loan amount in partnership with a bank that finances most of the remainder. All business sectors except the adult and gaming industries are eligible for loans that can range from $50,000 to $5 million.

The idea is to enable businesses to acquire fixed assets while retaining the working capital they need for growth and job creation. Amsterdam said the program recently worked well for a printer who obtained $4.3 million in financing to buy and install a new offset press using the invoice value of the machine as collateral. Processing and approval of 504 program loans, he said, takes only about 30 days on SBA’s end—the same as the bank.

High taxes on businesses, acknowledged Nicholas Terzulli, director of business development for the Nassau County Industrial Development Agency, represent the “biggest barrier to growth and entry in Nassau County—hands down.” He said that while his agency can’t necessarily lower the rates that businesses pay, it can help to protect owners against increases while making sure that they are taking advantage of all of the incentive programs available to them.

These include real estate, sales, and use tax exemptions; mortgage recording tax abatements; and financing through tax-exempt and taxable bonds. The agency’s Local Enterprise Assistance and Development Service (LEADS) program provides direct financial assistance and other kinds of help to the county’s small and mid-sized businesses.

Nassau’s IDA coordinates its efforts with those of state agencies and local utilities, connecting businesses with these entities to break logjams and move projects forward. On Long Island, said Terzulli, “everybody loves to work together on economic development” regardless of the turf or the politics involved.

Among Nassau IDA’s recent successes, he said, is the decision by automotive retailing software developer DealerTrack to build a $150 million campus in Lake Success following 18 months of negotiations with the county to craft a package of incentives. On a smaller scale, the IDA worked with a technology company that wanted to move from the South Bronx to a safer haven on Long Island. Taking part in the conversation that sealed the deal, Terzulli said, was the chief of police of Plainview, where the company now is located.

Scholarship Fund’s Holiday Bash Raises Spirits and Money on Behalf of Graphics Education

122214.gcsf_holiday_bash.1Nearly 300 industry members mixed and mingled at The Art Directors Club during the GCSF holiday bash.

The mood couldn’t have been more festive, the setting more sophisticated, or the cause more worthy as nearly 300 members of the industry gathered at the Manhattan gallery of The Art Directors Club to celebrate the both the holidays and the outstanding work of the Graphic Communications Scholarship Foundation (GCSF).

The December 11 event was notable not only as a social get-together, but also as a revival of camaraderie among groups and clubs that continue to represent graphics professionals in the New York City metro area. Six organizations joined in supporting the holiday bash, while numerous individual friends of the industry contributed time, cash, and gifts to help make the evening a success. Veterans who remember the industry’s annual rounds of Christmastime banquets and parties of 20 to 30 years ago heard many echoes of those much-missed affairs in the clink of glasses and the buzz of conversation at the gala for GCSF.

To those who attended, the scholarship fund needed no introduction as the metro area’s leading source of stipends for young people taking academic degrees in graphic communications and related disciplines.

A 100% volunteer organization that operates without professional staff or overhead expense, GCSF has distributed a total of $416,000 in scholarships to 116 students of graphic design and production since the fund’s inception in 2002. The not-for-profit 501(c)3 corporation acts as a coordinator for a large number of individual scholarship funds and gives all of the money collected through them to students attending or bound for colleges and universities with degree programs in graphic studies.

122214.gcsf_holiday_bash.2Not-so-secret Santa David Luke, a past president of the scholarship fund, emcees with the help of its current president, Jerry Mandelbaum.

Although scholarship recipients can use their stipends at any school with a recognized graphics studies program, GCSF’s hope is that most of them will bring what they learn back to the metro area by pursuing their careers here. To encourage this, GCSF has established a one-to-one mentoring program that pairs students with industry pros for 12 months at a minimum of two contact hours per month. Fifteen students currently are taking advantage of this structured opportunity to gain hands-on experience in graphics-related career fields.

GCSF’s annual scholarship awards presentation ceremony is a high point on the industry’s calendar of events. The tentative hold date for the 13th Annual GCSF Scholarship Awards Celebration and Ceremony at the Hearst Tower is Thursday, June 18, 2015. About a year and a half ago, the fund’s governing committee also began to talk about a year-end celebration to raise additional awareness for the fund and to give the industry in the metro area a new focal point for its still-vigorous fraternal spirit.

The result was the December 11 bash, which included, besides GCSF and the The Art Directors Club, the participation of Printing Industries Alliance, The Advertising Production Club of New York (APC-NY), IDEAlliance, and The Navigators (a club well remembered by many for its Service to Industry Award program). The evening also featured the inauguration of memorial scholarships in the names of industry figures Nina Wintringham and Steve Server, as well as a toy drive on behalf of the Harlem Children’s Zone. (So many toys were donated that some of them were sent to Schneider Children’s Hospital as well as to the Harlem organization.)

Richard Krasner, a past president of the fund and one of the event’s lead organizers, said that the joint support of the groups drove a turnout that enabled GCSF to cover the costs of the party at a ticket price of just $25. According to Krasner, more than a third of those who attended gave cash donations over and above the ticket price. Hearst and Time Inc. helped by buying blocks of tickets for employees.

Jerry Mandelbaum, GCSF’s current president, said that although fundraising wasn’t the primary reason for the holiday bash, the event pulled in almost $15,000 for scholarships from net proceeds, tickets and raffles, and group and individual contributions and donations.

122214.gcsf_holiday_bash.3GCSF stuffed a few holiday stockings with the help of a Chinese auction led by (from left) David Garcia, David Luke, Nick Patrissi, Diane Romano, Paul Nicholson, and Jerry Mandelbaum.

Krasner said GCSF hopes that the financial and social success of the holiday bash will turn it into a “legacy evening” that the industry can use as an occasion for celebration and good fellowship in years to come. A date for the 2015 edition of the event will be announced.

In the aftermath of any affair that comes off as happily as GCSF’s first holiday bash, thanks and recognition are due in abundance. GCSF gave a special shout-out to Olga Grisaitis and Hugo Verdeguer of The Art Directors Club for their help in making the first-floor space at the gallery on West 29th Street available for the party. Also thanked were those who contributed gifts for a fund-raising Chinese auction: Hallie Satz (Highroad Press), Paul Nicholson (Showtime), Diane Romano (Hudson Yards), David Garcia (LB Graph-X), and Ellen Hurwitch (RedTie Ltd.). Howard Weinstein got credit for sending personnel from Candid Litho to assist with setup and cleanup.

122214.gcsf_holiday_bash.4GCSF officers and trustees, from left: Jack Kott, Jerry Mandelbaum, Jessie Ann Murphy (also a GCSF scholarship recipient), David Luke, Diane Romano, Nick Patrissi, David Garcia, and Mark Darlow.

The planning committee for the holiday bash included Richard Krasner, Diane Romano, Ellen Hurwitch, and Mark Darlow. The current slate of GCSF officers includes Jerry Mandelbaum, president; Ellen Faith Hurwitch, vice president; Diane Romano, vice president; Steve Kennedy, treasurer; Nick Patrissi, secretary; and David Luke, immediate past president.

Our thanks and congratulations to everyone concerned for a swell affair and an uplifting reminder of the philanthropic unity of spirit that has always been our industry’s most distinguishing characteristic.

PIA Announces Retirement of Vice President Vicki Keenan, Who Will Be Honored at the 2014 Franklin Luminaire Awards Event

090414.vicki_keenan_retirementThe following news was furnished by Printing Industries Alliance—Ed.

Printing Industries Alliance (PIA) announces the retirement of Vice President Vicki Keenan, effective October 1, 2014.

Vicki joined the organization as Vice President in 2006 as part of its expansion into the New York metro region. She made an immediate and positive contribution by assisting the organization in understanding the various elements and concerns of the metro New York graphic communications industry.

From 1993 to 2006, Vicki served as Vice President, Executive Vice President, and President of the Association of Graphic Communications (AGC), a former regional affiliate of Printing Industries of America. A consummate professional, Vicki has devoted much of her career to representing the industry’s interests with regard to federal, state, and local governmental affairs.  In this capacity, she has been involved in a variety of critical issues including sales tax on postage and direct mail, clean air regulations, and creation of an $8 million Printers Relocation Fund, to name just a few.

Vicki started her career in Washington, D.C., with successful positions as a senior government and public affairs representative for the National Newspaper Association, Bechtel Corporation, and the American Consulting Engineers Council.

She has served for many years on the New York City Department of Education’s Graphic Arts Industry Advisory Commission. She was a founding board officer of the Graphic Communications Scholarship Foundation and a member of the East Orange (NJ) High School Printing and Graphic Communications Center Advisory Committee. She represented the industry on two New York City Mayoral Advisory Committees, Small Business and Graphic Arts. In 2012, she was honored with the Gold Key Award and inducted as an honorary member of Gamma Chapter, Gamma Epsilon Tau, an international Graphic Arts Honor Society at New York City College of Technology.

Vicki also has been instrumental in developing the annual Franklin Event (now the Franklin Luminaire Awards) into the premier networking event in the graphic communications industry.

In making the announcement, PIA Chairman Patrick R. Ryan commented, “PIA and our industry owe Vicki Keenan a debt of gratitude for her dedicated years of service and work on behalf of us all. Best wishes for a happy and healthy retirement!”

PIA President Tim Freeman remarked, “I have been pleased to call Vicki a friend since the day she started at AGC. We have worked together on a number of important industry issues through the years, and much of the success we have achieved on these issues should be attributed to her business acumen and political savvy. Her knowledge and perseverance have always been big industry assets that will be hard to replace. Please join the PIA membership, Board, and staff in wishing Vicki all the best for happy and healthy retirement.”

Vicki Keenan will be honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award at this year’s Franklin Luminaire Awards program on September 17, 2014 at Pier Sixty in Manhattan. For further information contact Printing Industries Alliance at 716-691-3211.

Printing Industries Alliance, a printing trade organization with offices in Amherst, NY, and Roselle Park, NJ, serves graphic communications firms in New York State, Northern New Jersey and Northwestern Pennsylvania.

COMMENT: This writer has had a decades-long relationship with print industry trade groups, past and present, throughout the New York metro region. No officer that I have ever met in any of these organizations has done as much to defend and promote the industry’s interests in the public sphere as Vicki Keenan. As PIA members know well, virtually every print-friendly legislative or regulatory change that has taken place in the region over the last 20 years bears her imprint. A consummate governmental insider with the instincts and the skills of an investigative journalist, Vicki has compiled a record of service to the industry that is unique among association executives. It’s a pleasure to add my voice to what’s sure to be an enormous chorus of gratitude and praise on the occasion of her retirement.

Joel Quadracci of Quad / Graphics Keynotes at PRIMEX East Conference in New York City

PH & JOEL QUADRACCI @ PRIMEX EAST.081314 Joel Quadracci (right) is interviewed by Patrick Henry at PRIMEX East.

On June 19, 2014, I had the privilege of interviewing Joel Quadracci, chairman, president, and CEO of Quad / Graphics Inc., in his keynote presentation at PRIMEX East, a leadership conference in New York City sponsored by IDEAlliance, Quad, and other industry partners. Answering my questions on behalf of WhatTheyThink, and fielding numerous additional questions from the audience, Quadracci covered a wide range of subjects relating to the state of the industry and Quad’s role in it. IDEAlliance has now posted the video recording of the nearly hour-long interview along with recordings of most of the other PRIMEX East sessions. These include remarks on the outlook for the U.S. Postal Service by its Postmaster General, Patrick R. Donahoe; and a report on the continuing turmoil in the periodical distribution industry by a leading authority in the field, John Harrington of Harrington Associates.

GCSF Presents “Champion of Education” Award to Jack Powers and Scholarship Grants to 28 Metro Area Students

062214.gcsf.1Leave it to polymath Jack Powers to inspire students with a quipu, the string of “talking knots” used by the Incas as a data recording device hundreds of years ago.

Wielding a quipu knotted with the major events of his own life as a metaphor for personal development, Powers accepted the 2014 Champion of Education Award from the Graphic Communications Scholarship Foundation (GCSF) at its 12th annual scholarship awards presentation ceremony on June 19. He directed his quipu lesson mainly at 28 students who shared $56,000 worth of study grants from GCSF, which has presented a total of $416,000 in scholarships to 116 students of graphic design and production since the fund’s inception in 2002.

GCSF is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit corporation that has grown from a back-of-the-envelope project into one of the industry’s most noteworthy sources of funding for professional education. Its donors include printing companies, technology suppliers, publishers, trade associations, and individuals. Under the supervision of David Luke (DAL Consulting), its current president, GCSF remains an all-volunteer initiative that has no paid staff, no overhead expenses, nor any mission other than channeling 100% of the money it raises to deserving students.

062214.gcsf.2The presentation ceremony, which takes place at the Hearst Tower Atrium in Manhattan, sees the addition of new scholarship grants almost every year the event is held. This year, GCSF trustee Diane Romano (Hudson Yards) introduced the John Tempest Memorial Scholarship Award, co-sponsored by the Advertising Production Club. It becomes one of more than two dozen scholarship programs now administered by GCSF, which establishes criteria for receiving the grants and evaluates student portfolios submitted in application for them. Applicants, who must be New York City metro area residents, can attend any college or university with an accredited graphics program.

Tempest scholarship donors include the DEER Foundation of IDEAlliance and Printing Industries Alliance (PIAlliance), both of which counted the grant’s namesake as a board member during his lifetime. The two groups are sponsors of the combined Franklin Luminaire Awards event in the fall, which will donate its net proceeds to fund GCSF scholarships.

062214.gcsf.3Diane Romano (r.) presents the first John Tempest Memorial Scholarship Award to Vanessa Lora (High School of Graphic Communication Arts / Syracuse University)

At the ceremony, GCSF also inaugurated a mentoring program to provide career-focused learning experiences for New York metro area college students pursuing careers in graphic communications. The four-year plan includes one-on-one coaching, workplace assignments, plant tours, participation at trade shows and events, and other activities designed to streamline their entry into the industry.

In all of these ways, GCSF serves high school, college, and graduate students throughout the New York City metro area who are preparing for or are enrolled in some of the country’s most prestigious graphic studies programs. GCSF scholarship recipients—many of whom have earned more than one yearly grant—attend or soon will attend The School of Visual Arts, Rochester Institute of Technology, Pratt Institute, Parsons the New School for Design, and Rhode Island School of Design, among others.

First-year grant earner Tasnima Tanzim, a freshman at Pratt, said she spoke gratefully on behalf of all GCSF scholarship recipients who, like her, once feared that they couldn’t afford to attend the colleges of their choice. SVA senior Elizabeth Zalewski, a four-time recipient, said that the grants had been vital to her development as a creative and to the shaping of her future career.

The students owe their progress in no small way to the activism of Powers, a booster and a fundraiser for GCSF from the beginning. Powers has been a one-man army for graphics education in the metro region for more than 30 years, lending his time and talents to the area’s most important public and private efforts for training in the field.

Tristate industry veterans also know him as an evangelist for digital production workflows long before the terms “evangelist” and “digital production workflows” even existed. Although, as a technologist and a consultant, he has moved on to other areas of interest, Powers continues to be the advocate most strongly identified with changing the metro area’s mindset from analog production to the digital solutions its graphic service providers use now.

Powers got an introduction almost as singular as he is in an adaptation of the classic show tune “You’re the Top,” with personalized lyrics by Frank Romano (RIT) and a zingy rendition by GCSF co-founder Mark Darlow. Romano hailed Powers as, among many other things, “the most brilliant marketing person you have ever met.”

062214.gcsf.4

Using his quipu, Powers makes a point about life and the value of education.

He illustrated the trajectory of the honoree’s early career by displaying a punched paper tape that he said Powers had coded to drive typesetting equipment in 1978. According to Romano, Powers—the son of a Jersey City, NJ, printer—was the first observer to recognize the enormous significance of the Internet for the printing industry.

Powers’s quipu had knots for the launch of his consulting business, his marriage and the birth of his daughter, his recent attainment of a master’s degree, and his receipt of the Champion of Education Award. He pointed out that the string still had ample room for further milestones he intends to tie in.

Education largely determines how many knots of achievement a person’s lifeline will contain, Powers told the students. He also counseled them to “write stuff down”; to be skeptical of “free” amenities from social media and the cloud; and to “remember the people” who helped on one’s way up.

Above all, never forget that everyone’s quipu is finite. “You don’t know how long your string is going to be,” Powers said. “Be sure that your knots have value.”

Conde Nast’s Townsend Is Honored with Prism Award from NYU-SCPS

14-0590Metro Graphics Reporter thanks Dona McKenzie (M.A. in Graphic Communications Management and Technology, 2014) for covering the event and providing the following post.

On June 17, more than 300 graphic communications and media professionals came together to raise funds for New York University’s Graphic Communications Management and Technology (GCMT) M.A. program at the 28th Annual Prism Awards Luncheon. In a departure from years past, Cipriani 42 was the newly chosen venue, a space that was both elegant and monumental in scale. The lively crowd mingled and networked at the opening reception as tuxedo-clad waiters passed around a never-ending supply of Bellini cocktails and sumptuous hors d’oeuvres.

After an hour of conversation and connections, the guests were gently ushered into the main dining area for the start of the program. There, William “Buzz” Apostol and Jennifer Bergin, Prism Committee Co-Chairs, welcomed everyone and thanked them for their continuing support of the GCMT M.A. program. The crowd enjoyed a tricolor salad of roasted beets with green beans and goat cheese while Dennis Di Lorenzo, Dean of NYU’s School of Continuing and Professional Studies (SCPS), took to the stage. Di Lorenzo praised the GCMT M.A. program for providing students with a “competitive skill set” learned under the guidance of working professionals in the media landscape.

Next, Dr. Joseph P. Truncale, GCMT professor and Advisory Board Co-Chair, gave a warm introduction for alumna Tina Powell, ’13, recipient of the Alumni Achievement Award for 2014. Powell, currently the Director of Business Management at Beacon Wealth Management, thanked her professors and former GCMT M.A. program director Bonnie Blake for their inspiration and their encouragement. She singled out faculty member Dr. Greg D’Amico for opening the most “important doors of all.” Powell finished by acknowledging the profound support of her family and friends. She graciously thanked her mother, saying, “to my mother, you will know my gratitude by the depth of my service.”

14-0590Scott Dadich, Editor-in-Chief of Wired, who accepted the 2014 Prism Award on behalf of recipient Charles H. Townsend, CEO of Condé Nast; and Tina Powell, recipient of the GCMT Alumni Achievement Award for 2014

Following lunch of prime roast filet of beef, risotto, and ratatouille, Paula Payton, Director of Strategic Communication, Marketing and Media Management Programs at NYU-SCPS, introduced Charles H. Townsend, Chief Executive Officer of Condé Nast. As Townsend, the recipient of the 2014 Prism Award for Distinguished Leadership, was unable to attend the event, monitors were placed throughout the venue so that the guests could see and hear his video thank-you. Townsend also expressed his deep appreciation to NYU for cultivating talent.

Accepting the Prism Award on Townsend’s behalf was Scott Dadich, Editor-in-Chief of WIRED. In a presentation entitled “The Future of Design, Invisible, Beautiful, Everywhere,” Dadich treated the audience to a micro- and macro-level look at the forces propelling contemporary trends in technology. He proposed that the main purpose of design is “human betterment’ and posited that “design doesn’t make things better, it makes them work.” Dadich argued that because of good design, “technology will fade into our everyday experience, instead of pulling us away from it.”

He said that the trends to watch are wearable computers, ultra high definition television (UHD TV), the game console wars, biometrics, and “quantified cars” that gather and share driving data. Mr. Dadich went on to say that all of these trends are data-driven, bandwidth intensive and individually focused, creating a potential “Hawthorne Effect” on society.

062114.nyuprism.1From left, Prism guests Junmian Sun (GCMT M.A., class of 2009); Bonnie Blake, past director of the GCMT M.A. program; and 2014 GCMT M.A. graduates Michael Patrissi, Melissa Pitts

Presented annually, the Prism Award recognizes distinguished leadership in the graphic communications media industry. The net proceeds of the Prism Award Luncheon help to fund student scholarships as well as student and program support for the NYU-SCPS GCMT graduate program, which prepares the next generation of media communications industry leaders. Since its inception, the Prism Award Luncheon has raised millions of dollars for scholarships for students in the GCMT program.

Previous NYU Prism Award recipients include Steve Forbes, chairman and editor-in-chief of Forbes Media LLC; Thomas J. Quinlan III, president and chief executive officer of RR Donnelley; Vyomesh (VJ) Joshi, former executive vice president, HP’s Imaging and Printing Group; Cathleen Black, former chairman of Hearst Magazines; Antonio M. Perez, former president and CEO of Eastman Kodak Company; Anne M. Mulcahy, former chairperson and CEO of Xerox Corporation; Janet L. Robinson, former president and chief executive officer of The New York Times; and Ursula Burns, chairman and CEO of Xerox.

NYU/SCPS to Honor Condé Nast CEO Charles Townsend with Prism Award on June 17

The Advisory Board of the NYU School of Continuing and Professional Studies (NYU-SCPS) Graphic Communications Management and Technology (GCMT) graduate program has selected Charles Townsend, chief executive officer of Condé Nast, as the recipient of the 2014 Prism Award. Presented annually, the Prism Award recognizes distinguished leadership in the graphic communications media industry.

Sponsored by the NYU-SCPS Master of Arts in Graphic Communications Management and Technology program, the 28th Annual Prism Award Luncheon will take place on Tuesday, June 17, 2014 at Cipriani 42 in New York City. Scott Dadich, editor-in-chief of WIRED, will accept the award on Mr. Townsend’s behalf and discuss future trends at the nexus of design and technology.

“We are honored and delighted to recognize Charles Townsend, an innovator in the media industry, with the 2014 Prism Award,” said Dennis Di Lorenzo, dean of the NYU School of Continuing and Professional Studies. “His leadership qualities and his ability to anticipate and to navigate change in a continuously evolving business environment are an inspiration to us all. We are equally fortunate to have Scott Dadich to serve as our Luncheon chairman and to have him accept the Award on Mr. Townsend’s behalf.”

0621214.charles_townsend_scott_dadichCharles Townsend; Scott Dadich

Previous NYU Prism Award recipients include: Ursula Burns, chairman and CEO of Xerox Corporation; Steve Forbes, chairman and editor-in-chief of Forbes Media LLC; Thomas J. Quinlan III, president and chief executive officer of R.R. Donnelley and Sons Company; Vyomesh (VJ) Joshi, former executive vice president of HP’s Imaging and Printing Group; Cathleen Black, former chairman of Hearst Magazines; Antonio M. Perez, former president and CEO of Eastman Kodak Company; Anne M. Mulcahy, former chairperson and CEO of Xerox Corporation; and Janet L. Robinson, former president and chief executive officer of The New York Times.

“It is a source of great pride for Condé Nast to join this esteemed group of former recipients in supporting the NYU School of Continuing and Professional Studies,” said Townsend.  “Talent is at the cornerstone of what makes all our organizations successful—I can think of no better investment in our future than growing these scholarship programs.”

WIRED is where tomorrow is realized,” added Dadich.  “I’m thrilled to be part of an event where ideas and innovation are fostered and to be accepting this prestigious award on Condé Nast’s behalf.”

The net proceeds of the Prism Award Luncheon help to fund student scholarships, as well as student and program support for the NYU-SCPS GCMT graduate program, which prepares the next generation of media communications industry leaders. Since its inception, the Prism Award Luncheon has raised millions of dollars in scholarship funds for students in the GCMT program.

“Over the years, hundreds of talented and deserving students have benefitted from Prism Award scholarship funds, graduating from the M.A. in Graphic Communications Management and Technology program and launching their own highly successful careers in an industry that continues to grow and thrive,” commented William “Buzz” Apostol, Prism Award Committee co-chair and vice president, sales – Americas at X-Rite/Pantone Inc.

Tickets for the Prism Award Luncheon are priced from $750 per person to $6,000 for a sponsor’s table of eight and $10,000 for a co-chairmanship (which includes a dais seat as well as a table of eight). Tables, ticket reservations, and additional information are available through the NYU-SCPS Office of Development. Contact Melissa Malebranche at 212-998-6950, by fax at 212-995-4039, or by e-mail at melissa.malebranche@nyu.edu. Visit www.scps.nyu.edu/prism to learn more about the Prism Award Luncheon and Scholarship.

 About Charles Townsend
Charles H. Townsend is chief executive officer of Condé Nast, the premier media company renowned for producing the world’s highest quality content for the world’s most influential audiences. Attracting 164 million consumers across its industry-leading print and digital brands, the company’s properties include some of the most iconic titles in media: Vogue, Vanity Fair, Glamour, Brides, Self, GQ, The New Yorker, Condé Nast Traveler, Details, Allure, Architectural Digest, Bon Appétit, Epicurious, Wired, W, Lucky, Golf Digest, Golf World, Teen Vogue, and Ars Technica. Condé Nast also owns Fairchild Fashion Media (FFM) and its portfolio of comprehensive fashion journalism brands:  WWD, Style.com, Footwear News, NowManifest, Beauty Inc., M, and Fairchild Summits. The company’s newest division, Condé Nast Entertainment, was launched in 2011 to develop film, television, and digital video programming.

During Townsend’s 20-year tenure at Condé Nast, the company has reached record profits, tripling its topline growth and exponentially expanding its distribution platforms. In just the past five years, Condé Nast’s footprint swelled by more than 100 million consumers and in 2013, the corporation was named one of the fast-growing companies in the digital video business. Earning a record 107 National Magazine Awards in the past 20 years, Condé Nast also led the industry as one of LinkedIn’s Top 50 Most In-Demand Employers in the World. In late 2014, the company will relocate to its new global headquarters at 1 World Trade Center, where it will play a leading role in the resurgence of Lower Manhattan.

Before being named CEO in 2004, Townsend served as Condé Nast’s chief operating officer after joining the company in 1994 as publisher of Glamour. Earlier in his career, he served as president and CEO of The New York Times’ Women’s Magazine Publishing Division and as publisher of various Hearst Magazines titles. Townsend is a graduate of the University of Michigan.

About Scott Dadich
Scott Dadich was named editor-in-chief of WIRED in November of 2012.

Prior to being named editor-in-chief, he served as vice president, Editorial Platforms & Design for Condé Nast. In this role, he oversaw the creative efforts to bring Condé Nast’s storied brand portfolio to emerging digital channels.

From 2006-2010, Dadich was the award-winning creative director of WIRED, where he initiated and led the development of WIRED’s groundbreaking iPad app, which was introduced in May 2010, one month after the introduction of the revolutionary device. Building upon that success, Dadich and his team have led all of the company’s brands into monthly tablet publication across multiple digital platforms.

Collectively, Dadich’s work has been recognized with eight National Magazine Awards, including three General Excellence Ellies (Texas Monthly, 2003; Wired, 2007 & 2009). He is the only creative director ever to win both the National Magazine Award for Design and the Society of Publication Designers Magazine of the Year award three consecutive years: 2008, 2009, and 2010. Additionally, he has received more than 100 national design and editorial awards from organizations such as the Art Directors Club, American Photography, American Illustration, The Society of Illustrators, and the Type Directors Club. In 2011, Fast Company named Scott Dadich one of the 50 Most Influential Designers in America.

Prior to joining Condé Nast, Scott was creative director of Texas Monthly, which was nominated for 14 National Magazine Awards during his tenure and won for General Excellence in 2003.

Dadich graduated from Texas Tech University with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree.