Richard Krasner Joins Direct Printing Impressions as EVP and Partner

richard_krasner_joins_dpi_052016Direct Printing Impressions (DPI) has announced the appointment of Richard Krasner as executive vice president and partner. Krasner, a 37-year print industry veteran, will be responsible for driving sales and revenue, maintaining effective communication between estimating and production, and handling general management responsibilities at DPI, a high-quality commercial printing firm located in West Caldwell, NJ.

“Great vision without great people is irrelevant,” said Rich Luggiero, president of DPI. “Richard Krasner brings a wealth of printing knowledge to the DPI team. His extensive background in print will benefit our organization and our customers alike.”

“Growth and awareness of the DPI brand have increased dramatically in the New York-New Jersey metro area graphic communications industry,” said Krasner. “The company is focused on profitability and working smart. This makes DPI a cost-effective alternative for both new and existing clients.”

Founded by the Luggiero family 20 years ago, DPI today has a fully integrated sheetfed offset plant that employs 22 people. With its Heidelberg presses and digital equipment, DPI can print in up to six colors with coating on stocks ranging from 35-lb. sheet to 39-pt. board. Its customer base includes corporate clients, manufacturers, advertising agencies, design firms, and the printing industry.

Krasner is well known in New York-New Jersey metro area graphics industry both as a sales professional and as a supporter of industry causes, particularly in education. He is a past president of the Graphic Communications Scholarship, Award and Career Advancement Foundation (GCSF), a volunteer group that has distributed more than $500,000 in learning grants to metro area students who enroll in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in graphic communications.

He also sits on the New York City advisory board of Virtual Enterprises International (VEI), a national educational nonprofit that transforms young students into future leaders and entrepreneurs. The programs of VEI are supported by The New York City Department of Education, educators, industry leaders, and mentoring professionals.

Gamma Epsilon Tau Fraternity Will Honor Dalton, Milkowski, and Romano at 2016 “Gold Key” Ceremony

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Tim Dalton, Meghan Milkowski, Diane Romano

Gamma Chapter of Gamma Epsilon Tau, the national graphic arts honor society, will present Gamma Gold Key Awards to Tim Dalton, Meghan Milkowski, and Diane Romano at its 2016 Gold Key Awards ceremony in New York City on June 1. The awards honor those who serve as role models through their exceptional records of service to the graphic communications industry.

Tim Dalton is a consultant and an educator who has worked in, visited, or audited more than 700 print shops during the course of his career. He also has a long track record of support for print industry trade associations. Dalton, who began as a press feeder, was an early proponent of bringing the benefits of information technology to graphic communications. This led him to become a specialist in computerizing printing operations in ways that helped printers eliminate bottlenecks and waste.

As an instructor, Dalton taught estimating and quality management at industry schools in Boston and New York for 25 years. He wrote a book on waste reduction that was published by the National Association of Printers and Lithographers (NAPL, now part of Epicomm), and he developed custom software for organizations such as Time4Media, BMG Music Group, and National Publishing Company. Dalton also audits chain-of-custody certification as administered by the principal forestry management organizations.

Dalton’s industry affiliations include Printing Industries of America, the International Association of Printing House Craftsmen, and the Education Foundation of the Graphic Arts, which he serves as treasurer. He also is an advisor to the Women’s Press Collective in Brooklyn and to the Advisory Committee for Technical Education in the Graphic Arts for the New York City public school system.

Meghan Milkowski currently is president of The Hill, an online news source for policy and political coverage. Her 25 years of publishing experience started at Life magazine, where she marked up pasteboards for prepress. Moving to Time magazine, she progressed from advertising production and plant operations to leadership roles in imaging, production, and business management.

Prior to joining The Hill, Milkowski served as vice president of production and circulation at Prometheus Global Media, the owner of Adweek, Billboard, Clio, Film Journal International, and The Hollywood Reporter. Initially hired to managed print contracts, paper purchasing, and distribution of the publications, she also undertook project management for information technology initiatives including the launch of an iPad publishing solution.

In 2015, Milkowski was the recipient of a Luminaire Award from IDEAlliance and Printing Industries Alliance. The award recognizes media production leaders for their positive influence, creative excellence, and personal dedication to the graphic communications industry.

Diane Romano is one of the most prominent figures in graphic communications in the New York City metropolitan area. She currently is president and CEO of HudsonYards Studios LLC, a provider of integrated publishing and media solutions. She previously was group managing director of Schawk, Inc.; president of the media and entertainment group of AGT/Seven; and president of Applied Graphics Technologies (AGT).

Romano got her start in the industry as a draftsman in 1967. Two years later, she joined PPI in the art department and rose through the ranks to become its president. In 1988, PPI merged with The Kordet Group to form AGT (later AGT/Seven). Romano became president of AGT in 1995 and was instrumental in a subsequent series of deals that led to her present leadership position at HudsonYards.

She has been renowned throughout her career as a champion of industry causes, particularly in education. Romano is a longtime officer of and fundraiser for the Graphic Communications Scholarship Award and Career Advancement Foundation (GCSF), a volunteer group that has presented more than $500,000 in scholarship grants to metro area students. Her long list of industry tributes includes the Luminaire Award, the Naomi Berber Award, induction into the Printing Impressions Printing Industry Hall of Fame, the Florence B. and Leo H. Joachim Award, the Advertising Production Club’s Advertising Production Person of the Year Award, and induction into Printing Industries of America’s Ben Franklin Honor Society.

Gamma Epsilon Tau is a national, coeducational, collegiate printing fraternity in which students of printing and publishing can meet and interact in a professional and social atmosphere.  It has eight chapters at colleges and universities that offer degree programs in graphic communications.

Gamma Chapter of Gamma Epsilon Tau is located at the Department of Communication Design (COMD) of New York City College of Technology, part of the City University of New York. Gold Key honorees in recent years have included Mark Darlow, Mike Connors, Frank Romano, Bob Sacks, Annette Wolf Bensen, Michael Cunningham, Florence Jackson, Timothy Freeman, and Kathy Sandler.

The 2016 Gold Key Awards dinner will be held on Wednesday, June 1, at Club 101, 101 Park Avenue, New York City. For more information or to purchase tickets, contact Prof. Frank Adae at (718) 260-5833 or by e-mail: fadae@citytech.cuny.edu

GCSF’s Festive “Holiday Bash” Nets $10K for Graphic Scholarships

121015.gcsf_holiday_bash.1What’s the best way to raise $10,000 in a few hours for a worthy cause? Throw a party. But the cause needs to be the Graphic Communications Scholarship Foundation (GCSF), and the party needs to have been the well-attended affair that the foundation hosted at the Manhattan headquarters of the Art Directors Club on December 10.

The money collected from admissions and sponsorships, 100% of which goes to fund scholarships, was on top of the $100,000+ in grants that GCSF presented to 31 students at its annual award ceremony earlier this year. The foundation, an all-volunteer 501(c)3 corporation, has been doing this kind of good work on behalf students of graphic communications in the metro area for 13 years.

Along the way, its mission created a focal point for educational giving by other graphics industry groups and clubs throughout the area. Their donations help to fund the various scholarships that GCSF administers and presents, and their members show their support personally by turning out in force for the GCSF “spring fling” and “holiday bash” events that have become highlights of the industry’s social calendar.

GCSF’s principal partners are IDEAlliance, the Advertising Production Club of New York (APC-NYC), the Art Directors Club, The Navigators, and Printing Industries Alliance (PIA). On December 10, nearly 200 of their members gathered in space donated by the Art Directors Club for a celebration of the year’s accomplishments. Also on hand were those who helped GCSF make the bash possible: individual sponsors and representatives of companies that  furnished sponsorship contributions and raffle prizes (see lists below).

But, the evening’s real celebrities were the 12 students who came as GCSF’s special guests. They are among the 131 students to whom GCSF has made $526,000 in scholarship grants since its founding in 2002. Like their predecessors, they are graduates of graphic studies programs at metro area high schools who are pursuing academic degrees at leading colleges and universities where the discipline is taught. They earned their stipends by submitting academic records and creative portfolios for evaluation by GCSF.

121015.gcsf_holiday_bash.2Natalie Alcide, a recipient of multiple GCSF scholarship grants, with David Luke, a past president of the foundation

One of them was Natalie Alcide, who delivered a short keynote thanking GCSF and its supporters. Now a junior at New York City College of Technology (City Tech), she is in her fifth year of receiving scholarship grants from the foundation. If she enters a graduate-level graphic studies program, she can go on receiving them for a total of eight years.

Alcide’s career ambition is to win an art director’s spot at an advertising agency. She said that as helpful toward that goal as the scholarship funding has been the experience of learning from industry professionals through internship and mentoring opportunities provided by GCSF.

Watch this blog for further news of GCSF activities, including its 2016 scholarship awards ceremony when the details of the event are announced. In the meantime, please consider spreading holiday cheer and helping graphics education by purchasing holiday cards and posters created by student recipients of GCSF scholarships.

121015.gcsf_holiday_bash.3GCSF officers, trustees, and scholarship recipients, back row, from left: John Aaron, David Luke, Jerry Mandelbaum, Diane Romano, Natalie Alcide (recipient), David Garcia, Mark Darlow. Front row: Jack Kott, Ellen Hurwitch, Richard Krasner, Jessie Ann Murphy (trustee and recipient), Nick Patrissi, Valerie Buonaiuto (recipient).

The GCSF holiday bash sponsors included Blanchard Systems; Buy-Rite Robbinsville; Candid Litho/ Candid Worldwide; Canon; DALIM Software; Thomas Saggiomo, dg3; Hearst Magazines; HudsonYards; Konica Minolta Business Solutions; LB Graph-X & Printing; Mark Darlow, Graphic Art Supply; Robert S. Rosenbaum; RR Donnelley; Unimac Graphics; Valerie Merone, Victoria’s Secret; and Xerox.

The raffle gift donors were Canon; Pantone; Adobe; DALIM, Bricco Ristorante Italiano, Christine Aaron, Showtime, RedTie, LB Graph-X, and Highroad Press.

Shootdigital Creative Team Joins HudsonYards Studios

HudsonYards Studios announced that it is expanding its capacity in computer generated imagery (CGI) and creative retouching services by integrating Shootdigital’s creative team and bringing along their established brand for the accelerated transition. “We are very excited about adding the Shootdigital team to our company,” said Diane Romano, president and CEO of HudsonYards Studios. “They are a multi-talented and creative group that bring in fresh ideas and additional expertise to our organization.”

New York City-based Shootdigital, well respected in the photography industry for high-end digital imaging talent, has been relocated to HudsonYards Studios’ 80 Broad Street facility in the heart of New York City’s financial district. As part of the transition, the group has been renamed “Shootdigital @ HudsonYards Studios.”

Shootdigital’s extensive imaging experience with fashion and beauty clients such as L’Oréal, Estée Lauder and NARS Cosmetics expands HudsonYards Studios’ impressive client list that includes iconic brands such as Victoria’s Secret, Hearst Magazines, West Elm and Wenner Media.

Take Part in Business Survey by WhatTheyThink; Earn Free Copy of New Book by Webb and Romano

Readers of this blog are encouraged to take part in WhatTheyThink’s online survey of printing and communications executives about their business outlook and the industry’s print and service offerings.

The survey, which will take only a few minutes to complete, poses questions that we think you will find relevant to the future direction of your business. Your participation is confidential. WhatTheyThink will not release your name or your answers to anyone; they will be combined with those of all of the other respondents in survey totals. This is strictly a research project and will not be used to create sales leads for advertisers or dealers.

To thank you for your assistance, WhatTheyThink will send you an executive summary of this project. You also will be able to download This Point Forward, the new book by Dr. Joe Webb and Richard Romano, upon completing the questions.

WhatTheyThink is the foremost source of news, opinion, and analysis for the graphic communications industry. The full link to the survey is https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/WTTBIZ2016

Students Join the Party at 2015 Franklin Luminaire Event

100515.franklin_luminaireThis happy group consists of trustees, students, and supporters of the Graphic Communications Scholarship Foundation (GCSF) enjoying the festivities at the 2015 Franklin Luminaire Awards event at Chelsea Piers 0n October 1. The generosity of sponsors enables students to attend the gala affair free of charge so that they can network with potential employers. Money raised at the event helps GCSF to provide much-needed financial support for New York City metro area students pursuing careers in graphic communications. For a complete description of the evening and its honorees, please see our report at WhatTheyThink.

“Digital Printing Think Tank” Event Shaping Up as a Must-Attend on Oct. 28

Printing Industries Alliance has announced the addition of Kodak, Vits International, and Kolbus as sponsors for its “Digital Printing Think Tank” event on Wednesday, October 28 at Club 101 in Manhattan (101 Park Avenue at 40th Street). They join Xerox, HP, Ricoh, Konica Minolta, RedTie, Muller Martini, and International Paper as sponsors of the all-day program on digital opportunities for printing firms.

The opening panel will feature a group of large and small printing firms that cut across the digital printing market. Mark Michelson, editor of Printing Impressions, will moderate the discussion about the path the companies took to the present and their plans for the years ahead. Panelists will include Cheryl Kahanec (EarthColor), Glen Boehmer (Sentinel Printing), Ron Sizemore (Influence Graphics) and Tim Boucher (B Squared).

The luncheon speaker will be Jeff Hayzlett, former Kodak CMO, primetime radio and TV host, and business author. His theme will be “Think Big, Act Bigger: The Rewards of Being Relentless,” which is also the title of his latest book. The first 100 registrants will receive a copy of it.

A panel of marketing executives from leading digital print technology vendors will discuss how they guide press owners in marketing digital printing and growing the market. Moderated by digital printing expert Marco Boer (IT Strategies), the panel will include Dave Wigfield (Xerox), Marc Johnson (HP), Gavin Jordan Smith (Konica Minolta), Shawn Lawson (International Paper), Andy Featherman (Muller Martini), and Vahaaj Khan (Kodak).

The all-day event (see the complete agenda here) will also be a networking opportunity enabling participants to compare notes and speak with sponsoring vendors. The cost of an individual registration is $149 and includes lunch and refreshments. To register, contact Kim Tuzzo at (716) 691-3211 or by e-mail at ktuzzo@pialliance.org

Vendor sponsorships are still available and will include two vendor staff tickets and three tickets for customers or prospects. The vendor sponsorship is $650 for those who are already annual PIA Platinum sponsors and $950 for others. A low-cost conversion to Platinum Sponsorship status will be available. Sponsors will receive recognition through event PR, literature, and signage.

For sponsorships contact Marty Maloney at (203) 912-0804 or by e-mail at m.maloney@bmcorp.com or mmaloney@pialliance.org

Printing Industries Alliance
“Town Hall” Meeting on Long Island Addresses Risks and Opportunities in New Technologies

Glen Boehmer (Sentinel Printing), left, and Tim Freeman (Printing Industries Alliance) lead the town hall meeting that took place on September 24 in Melville, NY.

Talking about new printing technologies is easy. Bringing a new solution into a printing business is another matter. There’s the cost of acquisition, the operating expense, the learning curve, and above all, the nagging question of whether the shop actually can make money with the equipment once it’s on the floor. It can be baffling, and sometimes the wish to go in a new direction doesn’t survive the uncertainty.

Printing Industries Alliance understands conflicts like these, and on September 24, it tried to assist its members on Long Island with a “town hall”-style meeting on the challenges of making the right investment decisions in emerging technologies for graphic production. The session was facilitated by Glen Boehmer, president of Sentinel Printing (Hempstead, NY), whose general advice was to keep an open mind about new technologies even when they do not appear to be a good fit.

“Every process has its reason for being alive,” Boehmer said, noting that a technology that does not work for a shop today may become the thing that helps to support it tomorrow.

With that, he led the group in a free-ranging discussion of their options in digital printing, software, workflow, and 3D printing. He asked the attendees first to gauge their own awareness of these technologies, and then to analyze what might be holding printers back from seeking more information about them.

The result was a lively back-and-forth that Boehmer kept going with pointed questions, flip-chart team exercises, and personal anecdotes that other shop owners in the group could readily relate to. Some highlights from the evening:

• Most agreed that the biggest barrier to implementation is “fear”: of confronting change, of adding cost, of becoming trapped in a commodity business. A practical consideration is space: will the shop have enough room to accommodate the new piece of equipment?

• Management information systems (MIS), especially those tied to customer-facing web-to-print (W2P) portals, streamline production and eliminate job touch points that cost printers money. Boehmer pointed out that for a fully automated producer such as Vistaprint, “the only touch point is the shipping.” But, MIS by itself isn’t a cure-all. It isn’t possible, Boehmer said, to automate or optimize “broken” processes in a shop with software.

• Wide-format printing is seen as an opportunity because the cost of entry is relatively low and the business is driven not by quality, but by the vast range of substrates the devices can image. Boehmer said that although the market is “close to flooded” with wide-format providers, “virtually nobody on Long Island” offers dye sublimation: a thermal wide-format process for printing rich color on textiles and fabrics.

• Andy Featherman of Muller Martini reminded the group that success with digital printing is as much about the finishing as it is about putting toner or ink on the sheets. He said that a finishing system operating in a “barcode-enabled touchless workflow” can guarantee accuracy by accounting for every barcoded sheet in the run.

• There is a reason why 3D printing, projected to be a $15 billion market by 2019, has attracted the attention of 4Over and other mainstream print providers, according to Boehmer. He said that the technology is “the same business we’re in” because it starts with a digital file and ends with a physical representation of an image.

• He asked the group to imagine taking digital files of portrait photography and turning them into “family dioramas” of three-dimensional keepsakes—a type of mass-market product that providers of 3D printing services offer now. With 3D printing, Boehmer said, commercial shops can add a profit-generating business-to-consumer (B2C) dimension to the business-to-business (B2B) economic model that most of them are locked into.

One way to offer an unfamiliar technology to customers without directly investing in it is to outsource the work to a partner equipped to provide the service, Boehmer said. He concluded by reviewing a checklist of questions to ask before committing to anything new. Among them:

• Will this technology make my business more sellable? Who would buy the business?

• Do I have people in my business who understand and can help me implement?

• What are the marketing and sales channels needed to bring in business? Where will the business come from?

• How quickly can you achieve an ROI from this investment? What profit levels can you achieve?

• Can you see yourself in that business?

• If you don’t add these capabilities, how will it affect your business?

“If I have more to sell, that takes the fear away,” Boehmer said. That’s what justifies the investment and the risk—but enthusiasm for the new technology has to be there as well.

“If you’re not juiced about it, I don’t think you should go there,” he said.

Call for Panelists: UV LED 2015

Are you planning to attend the UV LED 2015 conference in Troy, NY, October 28-29? WhatTheyThink, the event’s media partner, is looking for attendees who would like to take part in a panel discussion of the state of UV LED technology and its applications.

Printers with UV production experience are welcome, as are specifiers and buyers of UV printing. You don’t need experience with LED (light emitting diode) curing—just a wish to learn more about it and a willingness to talk about where UV LED printing might fit into your future plans.

Interested? Contact Patrick Henry, WhatTheyThink’s editor for labels and packaging, at patrick.henry@whattheythink.com, or call him at (917) 647-0590. For more infomation about UV LED 2015, visit http://uvled2015.com/

Early Sponsors for PIA’s “Digital Printing Think Tank” Include Xerox, HP, Muller Martini, Konica Minolta, International Paper, and RedTie

Printing Industries Alliance, the trade organization for the graphic communications industry in New York State, northern New Jersey, and northwestern Pennsylvania, has named the first six sponsors for its “Digital Printing Think Tank” program. The all-day event will take place on Wednesday, October 28th at Club 101, 101 Park Avenue at 40th Street in Manhattan.

The early sponsors are Xerox, HP, Muller Martini, International Paper, Konica Minolta, and RedTie. Several new sponsors will be named shortly. The number of sponsors for the event is limited to 20.

The interactive event will detail the trends and patterns in digital printing from high-quality, short-run sheetfed to production web inkjet. All applications will be explored, including high-end and production commercial printing; wide format; labels and packaging; and publications.

The opening panel will feature a group of large and small printers that cut across the digital printing market. Moderator Mark Michelson, editor of Printing Impressions, will lead them in a discussion about their paths to the present and to the years ahead. It is predicted that digital printing, which launched in 1993 and currently represents more than 20% of all printing, will account for 50% of all printing by 2030. Interactivity from the audience will be encouraged, and a Q&A session will follow.

Other panels will consist of leading marketing executives from digital printing vendors as well as consultants. They will discuss how they provide guidance in marketing digital printing and assistance in growing the market. High-profile keynote speakers (to be announced) will round out the day. The combination of expert presentations and actual printer experiences will give attendees the information they need to navigate the fast-evolving and rapidly growing digital printing market.

“Digital Printing Think Tank” will also offer a late-afternoon networking opportunity in which participants can compare notes and speak with sponsoring vendors.

An individual registration is $149 and includes lunch and refreshments. Vendor sponsorships will include two vendor staff tickets and three tickets for customers or prospects. The vendor sponsorship is $650 for those who are already annual PIA Platinum sponsors; $950 for PIA Associate Members; and $1,250 for nonmembers A low-cost conversion to Platinum Sponsorship status will be available. Sponsors will receive recognition through event PR, literature distribution, and signage.

For sponsorships, contact Marty Maloney, PIA executive vice president, at (203) 912-0804, or by email at m.maloney@bmcorp.com or mmaloney@pialliance.org

To register for the event, contact Kim Tuzzo at (716) 691-3211 or by email at ktuzzo@pialliance.org