Printing with a Higher Purpose: Women’s Press Collective

In the Bronx, an all-volunteer organization demonstrates why print remains foremost among the media as a force for social good.

Volunteers celebrate the completion of the first project printed on Women’s Press Collective’s donated Ryobi 3202 offset press. From left: press operator and board member Tim Dalton; Columbia University student Adam Cheguer; Columbia University PhD candidate Himanshu Singh; Operations Manager Lisa Danielle; and veteran press operator João Silva, who provided on-the-job training to all the participants.

Printers tend to think about printing in a mercantile way, and there is nothing wrong with that. Print is what they manufacture and sell to sustain their businesses. If they are commercial printers, the bulk of their output will be used to promote and advertise profit-making businesses of all kinds.

But print is also humanity’s first mass medium for speaking truth to power, exposing injustice, and driving social change. A New York City-based organization called Women’s Press Collective (WPC) is upholding print in that historic role by putting it into the hands of people who don’t do it for a living, but who have embraced it as a means of making their lives and those of other people better.

WPC recently received a cash grant from the Graphic Communications Scholarship Foundation (GCSF) in recognition of the training it offers to those who want to learn how to print in support of the causes they advocate. This is no small distinction for the group, which is staffed entirely by unpaid volunteers working with donated equipment and supplies. 

In fact, WPC’s pressroom in the Kingsbridge section of the Bronx may be the only remaining place in the New York City metro area where people who don’t work for printing companies can go to learn what an offset lithographic press is and how to operate one.

WPC’s other principal activity is making printing available to those who have worthy causes to advance, but who lack access to mainstream media – a mission that goes to the heart of WPC’s quest for social and economic justice.

Beyond Raising Consciousness

“That’s what we mean by printed materials,” explains Lisa Daniell, WPC’s Operations Manager. “Not just to raise consciousness about issues, but as organizing tools to help pull people together and begin to build solutions that come from the community working together.”

 Print helps people succeed at this in ways that corporately owned electronic and digital media don’t, according to Daniell. “We advocate for print because it’s independent. Another reason is that print encourages face-to-face organizing, where people meet each other in real life (and) have the chance to talk, to debate, to determine together how we can work together to address issues.”

These are issues of fairness, representation, community well-being, and other grassroots concerns that gather strength when printed material draws people together on their behalf. 

Examples include a petition to shield public housing in New York City from intrusion by private developers. A brochure to encourage neighborhood organizing by members of the Garífuna, a Central American ethnic group living in the Bronx. A “shopper’s guide” of local businesses trying to survive in a rust-belt region of Western Massachusetts. Each was produced by the group or the individual behind it under the tutelage of WPC volunteers.

“Those projects come to us through our doing extensive community outreach in neighborhoods all over New York City” and elsewhere, Daniell says. The training, which includes presswork, graphic design, and writing for publication, is free of charge, courtesy of experts in the fields who donate their services as instructors.

Last Bastion of Learning

With the disappearance of academic programs, union training facilities, and commercial trade schools for print production, WPC is, as far as it knows, the metro area’s only provider of hands-on learning in the subject for nonprofessionals. It follows a train-the-trainer model that expects learners not just to acquire these skills personally, but to share them with others as well.

“We are training people in rudimentary, basic press operation, and in some cases it’s their first time learning,” Daniell says. “We break down the specific skills of operating the press into a list of about 40 specific tasks that a press operator must know how to do. As soon as a trainee learns how to do a specific skill, then their job is to teach another trainee. This solidifies their knowledge, because they then have to explain it and demonstrate it and help someone else learn how.”

The method prepares people to handle presswork on their own in two to three months, according to Daniell. It is a two-stage learning curve. Trainees who have mastered the list of skills for themselves are deemed “certifiable” as press operators. Those who have helped others reach the same level of proficiency are considered fully certified.

Structuring the training in this way “makes us a stronger organization because it creates a process where there’s the ability to have continuous, independent community press operation,” Daniell observes.

Training and production take place in a shop that always strives to make the best use of the modest resources it has. Currently, its sole printing machine is a small-format, two-color Ryobi 3202 offset press supplemented by a POLAR 55 paper cutter and an assortment of tabletop bindery equipment. A flip-top plate exposure unit supports the shop’s film-based prepress workflow.

Generosity in Action

The film negatives for platemaking are donated, as is almost everything else that the WPC pressroom uses.

A recent issue of Collective Endeavor, the group’s quarterly magazine, thanks a list of benefactors who include Garry and Eli Koppel of Positive Print Litho Offset, principals of the Varick Street trade shop that contributed the Ryobi 3202 (along with a plate punch and 80 cans of ink). Jay Passarella donated the POLAR cutter and other postpress equipment from In-House Graphics, his shop in Queens.

Industry generosity also helps WPC maintain an inventory of printing stocks even as the paper market continues to be plagued by supply-chain shortages. 

“Most of the paper that we use is donated,” Daniell says. “In some cases, it’s donated by shops that have paper left over from a job. Larger shops buy a lot of paper to cover their jobs from regular clients, and then there may be something left over. So, they make that available to us.” The donor of three skids of paper graciously cut the sheets down to the 11″ x 17″ size needed for the Ryobi 3202.

The cash grant that WPC received from GCSF in June of this year is “already used,” according to Daniell, who notes that it helped to fund the purchase of pressroom furnishings such as industrial-quality paper shelving, a rollable work table, a safety cabinet for chemicals, and anti-fatigue mats for the floor. “We deeply appreciate it, and the pressroom looks great,” she says.

The Indispensable Medium

WPC’s belief in print as a lever for social justice and human rights goes back to its founding in 1982 by a group of women with backgrounds as labor organizers. Daniell says that some of the founders learnedprinting in order to produce the flyers and other materials they needed to generate support for the organizing efforts of some of the area’s lowest-paid workers: farm hands, domestics, and home care providers.

Originally from Palo Alto, Calif., Daniell joined WPC as a full-time volunteer in 1994 after stints in New York City’s finance and publishing industries. She says that at the time, “I had essentially no exposure to actual press production.” What she did have was a keen sense of society’s pervasive injustices and inequities – and an equally clear understanding of print’s hallowed role in combating them.

“Printing has a long history in movements in the United States that needed an independent voice,” she says, citing the American Revolution, the fight to end slavery, and the rise of labor unions as examples of watershed events that rallied people to their sides with the help of printing. 

“Print has always been a means to get these stories out,” Daniell says. It is a tradition that WPC works to perpetuate. “Look at our place here. We have the machines, we have people with the skills, we have the paper, we have the ink. That means we can print.”

But, Daniell emphasizes that it isn’t merely for the sake of putting ink on paper. “We need a way where we can meet face to face with each other, to have the difficult conversations, and determine how we can work together. At WPC, we teach a method of organizing that utilizes the production and distribution of printed materials for that purpose as well.”

She counsels that teaching people to print for themselves serves these objectives better than seeking attention from the mainstream media, which have a track record of either ignoring grassroots issues or misreporting them. She also expresses reservations about social media as tools for positive change, despite their ubiquity. 

“We’re not trying to say it’s not something people should use, but it is important to realize that its technological infrastructure is owned and controlled by some of the very wealthiest and most powerful corporations in the world,” Daniell observes. “We can put things up there, but we don’t control the algorithms as to what gets amplified or not.”

The Only Way to Do It

These sentiments ring true to community organizers who have turned to WPC for help in spreading the word. One of them is Cesar Yoc, a co-founder of Save Section 9, a movement aimed at blocking a plan to turn over the management and repairs of New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) properties to commercial developers. Save Section 9 asserts that the plan, know as Blueprint for Change (BFC), could lead to the privatization and sale of the city’s already dwindling stock of public housing units.

Yoc, who lives in NYCHA housing, wanted to alert fellow tenants to the threat posed by BFC and enlist their support in opposing the plan. For this, he says, digital media wouldn’t suffice. Many NYCHA residents didn’t have “smart” devices, and for those who did, “Zoom was a little impersonal” as a means of bringing them together.

“The only way that could be done was through printing,” Yoc says. He obtained it in the form of 1,000 petitions that he printed for Save Section 9 after joining WPC. Now he could “go out and knock on doors” and use the printed piece as a starting point for urgent discussions about the implications of Blueprint for Change. Distributing the petitions at “family day” events in NYCHA housing developments gained further recognition for Save Section 9.

Daniell sees Yoc’s story and others like it as emblematic of what the Women’s Press Collective exists to do.

“We’ve provided publication support for scores of community based organizations in New York City that are really on the front lines of economic, social, and justice issues like comprehensive healthcare, climate justice, and access to legal recourse,” she says. “WPC is a place where community organizations can produce their own media, get their own stories out, and produce printed materials to reach people in the community affected by these issues.”

A Worthy Wish List

The group’s growing number of projects along these lines keeps it fully committed to its mission. What WPC needs now, according to Daniell, is a redoubling of the support that has enabled it to become the force for good it aspires to be.

“We need volunteers to help with community outreach,” she says. “We need volunteers to help with our training sessions for presswork, design, and writing. Our ability to grow and do more projects and more training is very much directly linked to the number of people who are volunteering and supporting the effort.”

WPC also would like to augment its pressroom with a computer-to-plate unit and a small-format digital press. Those with expertise, equipment, or other resources to offer may contact the Women’s Press Collective at 718-543-5100 or by e-mail at womenspresscollective@yahoo.com.

Daniell credits her own development in printing to the guidance and encouragement she has received from people in the industry over the years.

“You walk into a shop, and people are proud of the work they do,” she says. “They’re proud of their craft. They want to show it to you. They want to teach it to you. They want you to know it and appreciate it also. And I found that really beautiful.”

“I really feel privileged to have met so many graphic arts professionals who have taught me about printing and taught me about the industry. The graphics arts industry has people in it who are just so generous with their knowledge.”

Call Goes Forth for Entries into Neographics 2022, the Industry’s Largest Regional Print Competition

Print is an industry. Print is a business. Print is a profession. But, print also is a craft that deserves to be showcased as the art form that it often succeeds in becoming.

This year, Neographics offers that opportunity to practitioners of the craft in what has become the industry’s largest regional competition for excellence in print. Two trade groups – the Graphic Arts Association (GAA) and Printing Industries Alliance – have extended the invitation to 4,000 potential entrants who have until July 29 to submit samples of their finest work for judging. The winners will be hailed at a banquet ceremony in Philadelphia on October 6.

The Neographics competition has been staged for more than 50 years by GAA, which represents printing businesses in Pennsylvania, central and southern New Jersey, and Delaware. Melissa Jones, president of GAA, notes that the tradition also salutes printers for being the providers of “one of the most longstanding parts of communication for humanity.”

The theme of this year’s event is “Celebrate Print,” a tribute to the industry’s richness and resilience in difficult times. As Jones says, “We’re here, we’ve made it, we’ve made it through COVID, and now we’re making it through the paper shortage, so we’re celebrating.”

A Good Neighbor Comes on Board

Joining in the celebration is Printing Industries Alliance, an association with a membership base in New York, northern New Jersey, and northwestern Pennsylvania. Both groups are encouraging their members to enter, although the competition also is open to nonmember printing businesses in their respective regions.

A joint effort makes sense because the territories “are so symbiotic” in their interests and outlook, according to Jones. “Even culturally we come together.” The print market “is so ingrained” across the regions that making the competition available to everyone in in it was a natural step forward for Neographics, Jones adds.

“We’re delighted that GAA has opened Neographics to participation by our members, who include some of the finest printers in the Northeast,” says Tim Freeman, president of Printing Industries Alliance. “Their entries are going to make this year’s competition a memorable one.”

Thirty-three judging categories are open to printing and printing-related businesses that submit work produced in the United States (a requirement) between January 1, 2021 and December 31, 2021.

There are three tiers of recognition: Franklin Awards for Excellence, given to pieces selected on their own merits; Best of Category, in which Franklin Award winners compete against each other for a unanimous vote by the panel of judges; and Power of Print, a best-of-the-best honor that also requires unanimous agreement.

A Bar Set High

These distinctions are not easy to win. The Neographics judges – veteran producers and buyers of print whom Jones describes as “really tough” – rate the pieces before them according to a list of stringent quality criteria. Emphasized, for instance, is color consistency: entrants must submit three copies of each piece in order to demonstrate it.

Entries are identified only by numbers – not their submitters’ names – during judging. Judges can move a piece from the category in which it was entered into a different category if they think it will get a more proper evaluation there. That way, says Jones, “we are being fair, and we give people more of an opportunity to really show off their work.”

“As print has evolved, the competition has also evolved,” she observes. Spanning all production processes, the judging categories include all of the major types of products in commercial and publication printing. The most heavily entered category is Books and Booklets, for hardcover and softcover examples above and below 32 pages. Annual reports, packaging, wide-format graphics, and finishing also are attracting strong shares of entries this year, according to Jones.

The most esoteric part of Neographics takes place in the category aptly named, “They Said It Couldn’t Be Done.” Entries here represent the kinds of jobs that can strike fear into the hearts of printers, involving what Jones describes as “just really unique, very difficult challenging print processes.”

For example, the category winner in a previous competition was a real estate piece with extra-heavy ink coverage and complicated crossovers that the customer wanted the printer to run on lightweight (40-lb.) offset stock in the form of a newspaper with nested signatures. “But they did it, and the agency and the client were absolutely delighted,” Jones says.

Members of the two sponsoring organizations can enter one piece for free and submit additional entries for $65 each; nonmembers pay $75 per entry. High school, tech school, and college students are welcome to compete in Neographics at just $15 per entry. Students as well as professional designers donate their services in creating the Neographics poster, entry form, and marketing materials.

National Competition to Follow

Everything will culminate in the gala Neographics Exhibition Awards Ceremony at Philadelphia’s Cescaphe Ballroom on October 6. From there, the top five winning entries – the Power of Print winner and four runners-up – will seek industrywide recognition in the 2023 Americas Print Awards, a new national competition organized by a coalition of 15 regional trade groups operating as Americas Printing Association Network (APAN). The national winners will be showcased at America’s Print Show 2023. (Dates and location TBD; America’s Print Show 2022 takes place in Columbus, Ohio, August 17-19.)

While everyone enjoys acclaim and accolades, bestowing them isn’t the sole purpose of Neographics. It’s just as important, says Jones, to see honorees “using this win to get the word out, to show what excellence you can display if you’ve done something amazing.” One of the judging categories is Printer’s Self-Promotion, and GAA helps award recipients to do just that with a “winner’s kit” of press releases that can be used to spread the good news.

Companies that have earned Neographics honors appreciate the marketing potential that comes with the prestige of capturing the awards. PDC Graphics of Southampton, PA has been entering the competition since 1997 and is one of its most prolific winners, including the Power of Print it took in 2020. Jim Rosenthal, president, can testify to the impression that success in Neographics makes on clients.

“There are certain types of customers that want to know how good you are,” he says. “It really adds legitimacy when we can say that there are a lot of printing companies out there, but not a lot that are as good as we are. If the requirement is something amazing, that’s why you want to talk to us, because we can do that.”

‘Now Do That for Me’

For customers, the quality of Neographics-caliber work can be a deal-clincher, according to Rosenthal. As he puts it, “when someone sees these pieces, they say, if you can do that for someone else, you can do that for me.”

Jeff Pintof, a senior account executive with The Standard Group in Reading, PA, has taken part in Neographics for nearly 20 years, serving frequently as chairman of the event. Standard is a two-time Power of Print winner, one of which was the “They Said It Couldn’t Be Done” job noted above.

Participating in Neographics over the years “gave independent reviews of the quality of our work and enabled me to develop business that I wanted,” Pintof says, noting that the entries his team put together focused on high-end, niche work. “By entering the competition and sharing the awards with those clients, it helped me to bring a lot more business in.”

Pintof promotes Standard’s winning entries through social media and encourages customers to do the same by taking them to lunch and presenting them with copies of the award. Prospects get samples of the winning pieces along with job specs and handwritten notes of introduction. By leveraging Standard’s Neographics track record in this way, Pintof says, “I’ve developed a lot of clients.”

Done Well Can Win

He thinks that every printing company eligible to enter Neographics should take its own best shot at the honors. “Everybody has a chance,” he says, pointing out that submitted pieces don’t necessarily have to be fancy or complicated in order to win. “A lot of the jobs are just done well. You never know what the judges are looking for.”

Pintof also recommends entering as a gesture of solidarity with the sponsoring trade associations, and with other printers – a sentiment that Rosenthal shares.

Supporting Neographics “is very good for our industry,” Rosenthal says. “If other companies are doing well, that probably means we are doing well also. It proves out the kind of work we can all do. It’s bragging rights for all of us, but it’s bragging rights for us as a whole. You get to give everyone an ‘attaboy’ for our hard work.”

Those spurred to action by these words should remember that the entry deadline for Neographics is firm – all entries and fees must be received no later than July 29. Download the entry form here. For additional information, contact Pat Rose at GAA: (215) 396-2300; prose@gaaonline.org.

A Challenging Checklist

Neographics judges use poker chips to tag the entries they believe should move to the next round of the process. Those chips do not fall randomly. To earn one, a piece will have to measure up under any or all of the following criteria:

• Register, clarity, and neatness of impressions
• Sharpness of halftones and line drawings
• Definition in material requiring detail
• Attention to symmetry of margins and columns
• Richness and tonal qualities of color
• Effective contrast or softness as required by design or purpose of piece
• Quality of binding, stitching, punching, die-cutting, inserting, and folding
• Unusual spacing, size, shape
• Construction and format
• Clarity and readability
• Effective execution of color
• Overall visual impact
• Lineups and crossovers
• Consistency of color

The judges examine the finished products as well as how the job was performed. The number of colors, press size and printing process are used in determining the winners.

Graphic Communications Scholarship Foundation Salutes 2022 Awardees

From left, Graphic Communications Scholarship Foundation (GCSF) board members David Garcia, Amybeth Menendez, John Aaron, and Diane Romano (president); Samantha Farber, recipient, 2022 APC-NYC Judy Salmon Scholarship Award; Kaye Torres, recipient, 2022 Graphic Communications Scholarship Foundation Scholarship Award; Daniel Wong, chair, Communication Design Department, New York City College of Technology; Ellen Hurwitch and Natalie Alcide, GCSF; and Lisa Danielle, operations manager, Women’s Press Collective.

The Graphic Communications Scholarship Foundation (GCSF) returned to center stage with the scholarship awards ceremony it hosted in New York City on June 22 – its first such in-person event in three years.

Diane Romano, president of GCSF, acknowledged that COVID-19 had temporarily slowed down the group’s efforts to support young people from the New York City metropolitan area who are enrolled in graphic communications study programs. “But we never stopped working on behalf of the students, and now we are back in full force,” she declared.

GCSF marked its reappearance by awarding cash scholarships to four students and presenting cash stipends to one school and two organizations that train people for careers in graphic communications. The evening’s grants totaled $20,500, bringing to $1.2 million the amount of money that GCSF – an all-volunteer, nonprofit 501(c)(3) entity – has raised and contributed in the cause of print industry education since awarding its first scholarships in 2002.

Joining GCSF for the ceremony was the Advertising Production Club of New York (APC-NYC), which endowed one of the four student scholarships in honor of the late Judy Salmon, an APC-NYC past president and member of the board. The event took place in space provided by Grey Global, a leading advertising agency, at its New York City headquarters in Manhattan’s Flatiron district.

This year’s student scholarships are the latest of the more than 450 individual grants that GCSF has made to date. The 2022 recipients, their schools, and their awards are:

• Kenneth Murillo, St. John’s University, 2022 Dynamic Dynosaur Award, funded by Dino Manuel, creative director of Dynamic Dynosaur, a media studio

• Kaye Torres, Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT), 2022 Graphic Communications Scholarship Foundation Scholarship Award

• Melody Clarke, Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT), 2022 Graphic Communications Scholarship Foundation Scholarship Award

• Samantha Farber, University of Michigan, 2022 APC-NYC Judy Salmon Scholarship Award

The award honoring Judy Salmon is the most recent cooperation on behalf of graphics studies between GCSF and APC-NYC, which has contributed nearly $280,000 in support of scholarships over the years. Co-presenting it were Eloise Martinez, APC-NYC treasurer and board member, and Paul Nicholson, board member. Both spoke of the scholarship’s namesake with affection and respect.

“You never saw her without a smile,” said Martinez, citing Salmon’s long record of dedicated service as a member and an officer of APC-NYC. Nicholson, her manager at Showtime, called her “the most enthusiastic print producer I’ve ever seen on the planet.”

Introducing the three institutional awards, Romano noted that contributing to group activities gives GCSF an additional way of channeling funds to deserving students of graphic communications.

John Aaron, a member of GCSF’s board of directors, presented a grant to the Women’s Press Collective (WPC), a Bronx-based organization that teaches people how to print in support of grassroots advocacy campaigns in their communities. “Gutenberg probably would have been pretty impressed” by WPC’s efforts to make the craft of printing accessible to the public, Aaron observed.

For the last 21 years, the Annual Citywide Graphic Arts Competition has invited New York City high school students to showcase their best work in graphic design, packaging design, digital illustration, photography, and other creative categories. Presenting its award, GCSF board member Ellen Hurwitch noted that the 2022 competition hosted more than 100 students and distributed prizes worth over $4,500.

This year’s competition took place at New York City College of Technology (City Tech), where the Department of Communication Design has become the recipient of a 2022 grant from GCSF. Located in Downtown Brooklyn, City Tech is a unit of City University of New York (CUNY) and has a long history of offering degree programs in graphic communications.

Accepting the grant award from Hurwitch, department chair Daniel Wong said that the funding would be “an immense help” in creating a new research design center, covering students’ contest entry fees, and otherwise assisting them in pursuing their studies. He noted that CUNY is consistently challenged for financial aid and that little of what it does receive trickles down to a level where it can be used to help students directly.

Wong’s department presently serves 500 students preparing for careers in graphic design, advertising, motion design, illustration, and web design. He pointed out that those in their third year of study are only now starting to find out what in-person college learning and campus life are like because of restrictions imposed by COVID-19. The challenge, Wong said, is to give them the kinds of experiences that college students ordinarily would expect at this stage of their educations.

Providing that kind of help is what GCSF exists to do, according to Romano. Through scholarships, mentoring, and training, “our goal is to assist students in accomplishing their goals, and build the graphic communications workforce.”

“The future is in the students,” Romano declared, calling upon the industry and corporations that rely on graphic communications to support GCSF with their donations. This year, the business benefactors include Candid Worldwide, brilliant:, Mohawk Fine Papers, Neenah Paper, and LB Graph-X & Printing Inc.

Because it works without professional staff or dedicated office space, GCSF has virtually no overhead expenses. All of the money it raises passes through to students as scholarships and to qualifying organizations as cash grants. To donate, and for further information, visit https://gcsfny.org/donate/.

A Time-Honored Tradition Is Restored with the Return of the Franklin Event

Tim Freeman (left), president of Printing Industries Alliance, with Franklin Award recipients Michael Duggal and Thomas J. Quinlan III.Tim Freeman (left), president of Printing Industries Alliance, with Franklin Award recipients Michael Duggal and Thomas J. Quinlan III.

Picture the scene: a crowded but convivial cocktail reception. An elegant, jazz-accompanied sit-down dinner in a posh private club. Honors proudly paid and sincerely accepted. Networking in an intimate after-party at the bar to top it all off.

Affairs mixing business and pleasure like this used to be something to look forward to in the printing industry until COVID-19 cut them short. But, the tradition came back to life on November 17 with the return of the Print Drives America Foundation Franklin Event, a live, in-person celebration of industry service, leadership, solidarity, and the enduring power of the medium that continues to inspire them.

Hosted by the Print Drives America Foundation and Printing Industries Alliance, the 68th edition of the Franklin Event drew 180 people – all showing proof of vaccination – to the 101 Club in midtown Manhattan. The centerpiece of the evening was the presentation of the Franklin Award for Distinguished Service to Thomas J. Quinlan III, the 2020 honoree; and Michael Duggal, selected to receive it in 2021.

Quinlan, the retired Chairman and CEO of LSC Communications, held some of the industry’s highest-level executive posts throughout his 26-year career in printing. Duggal, CEO of Duggal Visual Solutions, is renowned for turning an analog prepress business into one of the nation’s most fully equipped providers of visual imaging services.

Roll Call of Distinction

Their Franklin Awards are the latest in a series of tributes that began in 1952 as the printing industry’s salute to iconic personalities on the national stage. In keeping with that idea, recipients have included former U.S. presidents, military leaders, industrialists, and other celebrities.

In recent years, however, the honor has refocused on leadership and service within the industry itself, hailing members who have compiled exceptional track records in business as well as in support of worthy causes. The 2020 and 2021 recipients are exemplars of both.

Introducing Quinlan, Steve Drew of LSC Communications praised the modesty and kindness that have keynoted the honoree’s long list of professional and personal achievements. “Tom is humble, Tom is private,” Drew observed. Whenever need arose, “Tom didn’t tell stories – he just acted quietly.”

Among Quinlan’s many good deeds on behalf of others was paying full tuition for students in Staten Island, his home borough, who had lost parents in the 9/11 attacks. Quinlan also raised $100,000 for the graphic communications scholarship program at New York University, which recognized him with its Prism Award in 2011.

In his acceptance remarks, Quinlan admitted that he barely knew what a printing press was on the day that the legendary Robert G. Burton, Sr., hired him away from the financial industry to become the assistant treasurer of World Color Press. From there, the arc of his career took him to the pinnacle of leadership in the commercial printing segment, culminating in his 2007 appointment to president and CEO of R.R. Donnelley & Sons Company, then the industry’s largest commercial printing firm.

‘Some Kid from Staten Island’

“Whoever thought that some kid from Staten Island would be in charge of R.R. Donnelley?” Quinlan mused. Looking at the bigger picture, he said that the continuing strength of the print medium lies in the fact that “this industry has to innovate every day” as it has done since Gutenberg’s time. Quinlan also predicted a rebound for print as digital and social media, mired in controversy and facing regulatory pressure, start to lose some of their hold on audiences.

“You can’t talk about grit without talking about Michael Duggal,” declared Glen Rabbach of Duggal Visual Solutions. “Mike believes in vision, and he believes in process.”

The honoree displayed both virtues when he made an extraordinary change to the company’s production operations early in 2020, during the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic in New York City. Rabbach related how, on just a few days’ notice, Duggal pivoted the business almost entirely to manufacturing personal protective equipment (PPE) for front-line responders. Duggal Visual Solutions eventually would deliver more than 3 million pieces of PPE, saving lives and helping to preserve its own existence as a business as well.

“Mike has led us back to the light at great sacrifice,” Rabbach told the audience.

Today the honoree presides over a technology-rich operation that has expanded beyond its base in New York City to additional sites in Portland, Ore., and Burbank, Calif. Under his stewardship, the company has come a very long way from the film processing business that his father, Baldev Duggal, started in 1961 and that he took over as CEO in 2002.

Accepting his Franklin Award, Duggal identified quality and creativity as the main motivations for him and his staff, whom he thanked for helping him to make the company what it is. “I’ve been blessed by the loyalty of amazing people,” he said. “I’ve been blessed to see what people can do when they work together.”

‘Let’s Value What We Do’

Duggal also offered encouragement to the industry as a whole. Instead of obsessing about the numbers, he urged, “let’s value what we do. We’ve been dominated by larger suppliers and larger customers, and we’ve fallen victim to price.” He reminded the audience that print is a force for good in every community across the country. When he asked those in the room to stand up if they had ever donated printing to schools, churches, or other local organizations, many rose to their feet with him.

Spreading the word about print’s pervasive influence is the mission of the Print Drives America Foundation, a 501(c)(3) initiative aimed at burnishing the medium’s reputation and increasing its market share. Under the direction of Martin J. Maloney, the foundation operates a multi-pronged national marketing and public relations campaign to raise awareness of print among media-buying decision makers.

The success of the effort, said Maloney, is reflected in the fact that more than half of the 10 print segments promoted by the foundation “have gone through the roof” in terms of growth. He added that together, the segments dwarf all other media in volume by half, including internet and broadcast.

“Print is colossal, print is high-tech, print is green, and print is cool,” Maloney declared. “Print is firmly back in the driver’s seat.”

By the same token, the Franklin Event is firmly back on the industry’s social calendar. The date for 2022 will be announced by Printing Industries Alliance, the trade association representing the graphic communications industry throughout all of New York State, the northern half of New Jersey, and northwestern Pennsylvania.

“The level of buzz we heard during this year’s event tells us that we made the right decision,” said Tim Freeman, president of Printing Industries Alliance.

Direct Mail Printer Didit DM Expands Operations on Long Island With New Facility in Lindenhurst

Didit DM, the Long Island based direct marketing division of full-service marketing and public relations agency Didit Digital, announces today that it has moved from its location at 15 East Bethpage Road in Plainview, N.Y., to a new facility at 1180 Route 109 in Lindenhurst, N.Y. In the current marketplace, Didit DM has been able to maintain a stable foothold in the direct mail industry, and the company projects continued growth in business. The new location’s space and layout will effectively meet the current needs of the company and its clients.

“Didit DM has been able to maintain its substantial growth rate through its high-quality service, combined with the forward-thinking approach of linking a printing and mailing house with our parent company, Didit Digital, a cutting-edge, multi-service agency,” notes Didit Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder Dave Pasternack. “What’s even more amazing is that this continued growth has been accomplished despite the challenges of the printing and mail industry and the consequences of the pandemic.”

Didit DM provides creative offerings, print production, letter shop capabilities, and fulfillment services across a host of industries and a diverse client base, from large international corporations to local retailers. Comprised of an elite group of strategists and specialists who excel in all areas of the direct mail offering, Didit DM’s pioneering techniques include data programming, direct mail design, print management, advanced mail tracking, direct mail technologies, postal optimization, and variable data imaging.

Didit DM Vice President of Operations Amy Pasternack says, “Due to a stability in our client roster and the projected increase in printing and mailing campaigns, the new location will greatly benefit our company and our client services. We will be in the ideal position to enhance the use of our resources, further expand our digital mailing footprint, and continue to bring forward innovative capabilities to our customers.”

Due to Didit DM’s steady growth and successful outcomes, the Lindenhurst location is the agency’s third move since 2015 when the agency moved from 30 Commercial Court in Plainview to a larger space at 15 E. Bethpage Road in the same town.

Anticipation Builds for 68th Print Drives America Franklin Event on Nov. 17

Just as Broadway theatre has finally returned to New York City, it’s almost showtime for the printing industry’s most prestigious social gathering in the metro area: the 68th Print Drives America Franklin Event.

Printing Industries Alliance has again announced that the confirmed date for the 68th Print Drives America Franklin Event is Wednesday, November 17, 2021. The evening’s stars will be Thomas J. Quinlan, the former CEO of LSC Communications and RR Donnelley, who remains the 2020 Franklin Honoree; and 2021 Franklin Honoree Michael Duggal, CEO of Duggal Visual Solutions.

The event, a festive salute to the industry and its leading lights, had to be postponed last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. But, with theatres, restaurants, and sports stadiums reopening their doors, the program is once again ready to provide the kind of socializing that the industry in the metro area has been obliged to put on hold for far too long.

The event will run from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. with cocktails at 6 p.m., dinner at 7 p.m., and the Franklin Awards ceremony at 8 p.m. followed by an after party. The venue is Club 101, a private club located in the iconic Kalikow Building on Park Avenue at the corner of 40th Street.

The pent-up demand to resume the industry’s premier social event in the metro area is seen in the fact that 16 table sponsorships have been confirmed to date. Because a full-capacity audience is expected, attendees are urged to reserve their tables and seats now.

Proceeds will go to the Print Drives America Foundation, the national champion and cheerleader for the America’s print industry. “The Franklin Event is an opportunity to support and celebrate the entire print industry,” states Marty Maloney, Executive Vice President of the Printing Industries Alliance and Executive Director of Print Drives America.

Sponsorships are available at the same cost as in the past: $6,500 for tables of eight, and half tables of four for $3,500. Individual seats are $350. To sponsor a table or reserve a seat, e-mail Marty Maloney at mmaloney@pialliance.org or call him at 203-912-0804.

Sponsored tables are considered donations and are tax deductible. As a reminder to attendees, all New York City venues like the 101 Club now require proof of vaccination to be shown at entry.

About the Franklin Event

Printing Industries Alliance has presented the Annual Franklin Event since 1952. During that time, a wide variety of impressive national and industry dignitaries have received well-earned recognition at the event. Franklin Event proceeds are earmarked solely to support the Print Drives America Foundation, a national initiative developed to give Print a stronger voice, increase Print’s dominant market share, highlight its effectiveness and ROI, and enhance its positive perception. The Print Drives America Foundation is registered as a 501 (c) (3) charitable organization.

About Printing Industries Alliance

Printing Industries Alliance, an independent association, represents the graphic communications industry in all of New York State, the northern half of New Jersey and northwestern Pennsylvania. This geographic footprint is the most important printing market in the U.S., with more Fortune 500 companies than any other state or region. The area is also the global center for several critical worldwide industries including finance, marketing, media, real estate, and culture; as well as being one of the world’s largest population centers.

In addition to print advocacy and education, the PIA provides its members with a variety of consultative, informational and cost-saving services. The association also provide governmental representation at the federal, state and local level. The PIA is headquartered in Amherst, NY with a metro New York office in Manhattan at 400 Chambers Street.

NY-Metro Printers Recount the Dire Events of 9/11, a Day They Can’t Forget

Note: this post first appeared in a special issue of Signature, the newsletter of Printing Industries Alliance.

“It was just a day – blue skies, a clear day. It began as a very unremarkable, done-it-a-thousand-times kind of day.” So remembers printer Benjamin Hort of his first moments at work on September 11, 2001, about two miles north of the 14.6-acre patch of land that was about to pass violently into history as Ground Zero of the World Trade Center terror attacks.

For Vicki Keenan, an executive of a printing trade association, 9/11 opened with the unimaginable sight of a jet airliner slamming into one of the Twin Towers as she approached Manhattan on her morning rail commute. It ended with the wrenching news that a close personal friend – a New York City Fire Department chaplain with whom she’d lunched just the day before – had been identified as one of FDNY’s first casualties in the disaster.

In between, for Hort, Keenan, and nearly everyone else connected with New York City’s printing industry, stretched a day of anguish and destruction that claimed the lives of 2,763 people in the Twin Towers and shook the national psyche as it had never been shaken before.

Printing companies, concentrated in and around Canal, Varick, and Hudson Streets with a clear line of sight to Ground Zero, were closer to what happened that day than any of the city’s other manufacturing businesses. That awful proximity gave the people who worked at those companies memories that are as searingly vivid today as the actual events they witnessed, however unwillingly, 20 years ago.

Hort is president of Enterprise Press (Englewood, N.J.), a fourth-generation family business that at the time operated in a building it owned at 627 Greenwich Street. He began the day as he usually did at 8 a.m. in his office on the 10th floor.

The morning’s routine quickly evaporated. “I remember that someone remarked that there was smoke coming out of the first tower,” Hort says. “Nobody knew what it was, and we didn’t think that much of it.” A little while later, he heard the “yelling and screaming” as his staff watched the second plane find its target.

By midmorning, both towers had imploded. “That I did literally see with my own eyes,” says Hort. “It was fast – just go to smoke.”

Eyewitnesses say disbelief overcame them as the attacks unfolded, at least at first.

‘Another Orson Welles Thing’

Jack Kott, owner of Bergazyn & Son, a specialty finishing business located at 200 Hudson Street at the corner of Canal Street, says that when the planes struck the towers, his plant was “literally almost on top of it.” He admits that the initial reaction to reports coming from the media was, “here we go, another Orson Welles thing” (referring to The War of the Worlds, the famous radio broadcast of 1938 that triggered panic among listeners who took its fantastic story as fact).

The grim truth emerged when, in the elevator, a fellow printing tenant in the building asked him, “Did you just see the plane that barely missed our roof?” Gathering with others in a conference room on the sixth floor, says Kott, “we saw the first tower in flames, and then we saw the second plane hit. That apparently was the plane that had just missed our building.”

Now based in Long Island City, Cosmos Communications then did business on the 2nd floor at 175 Varick Street just north of Canal Street, about a half a mile from Ground Zero. At street level, COO and partner Joe Cashman and his staff found themselves staring straight at the north side of the North Tower moments after the impact at 8:46 a.m.

“We were down on the street less than a minute after the first plane hit,” Cashman recalls. “You could almost make out an indent of the fuselage. We just couldn’t understand how it was possible on such a clear, beautiful day that a plane could fly into the tower.”

‘The Whole Building Shook’

On the 9th floor of 233 Spring Street, two blocks north of Canal Street, trade printer CQS operated in a manufacturing “cluster” then typical of the industry in lower Manhattan, with other printing businesses on three floors of the building and a satellite pressroom on nearby Vandam Street. CQS pressroom foreman Robert (Bo) Donnelly had completed makeready on two presses and was awaiting visits by customers for press checks at 9 a.m.

Before the customers got there, he says, “the whole building shook” as the first plane passed over it at almost rooftop height. Donnelly didn’t witness the ensuing impact at Ground Zero, but he says that upon looking down Varick Street moments later, “we could see the hole in the North Tower” and the beginning of the inferno that would engulf the structure and cause it to collapse.

Then, like a “big missile,” the second jet punched into the South Tower at 9:03 a.m., setting it ablaze. “We watched the South Tower explode,” Donnelly says. “We saw the metal arcing” as if it were being welded. Soon after, the entire, 110-story building pancaked in a storm of smoke and debris.

“The way it went down was unbelievable,” he says. “About a half hour later, the North Tower started arcing – the metal was actually burning. Then that went down.”

Cashman recounts how he, too, “was watching the North Tower virtually sink in front of my eyes. I remember the TV antenna on top of the tower just wobbling as the tower sank. Your eyes were seeing something that your mind is not allowing you believe is happening.”

Radio reports brought news of the 10:28 a.m. collapse of the South Tower, which was the first of the pair to come down despite being the second one struck. Now the full dimensions of the attacks were becoming clear, but even so, “we were dumbfounded,” Cashman says.

From Bad to Far Worse

Looking on from a greater distance – but with no less horror – were Keenan and other employees of the Association of Graphic Communications (AGC), a trade group representing graphics businesses in the five boroughs, Long Island, and parts of New Jersey. Keenan, the association’s executive vice president, already had an inkling of what had happened by the time she reached AGC’s offices on Seventh Avenue at 29th Street.

“The train had just pulled out of Newark/Penn Station on its way into the city,” she says of the trip in from her home in New Jersey. “You go through the Meadowlands, and I had a window seat. I saw this plane in the sky, and then I saw it hit the tower, and there was a huge ball of fire. Both me and the guy next to me, and a couple of people in front and back of me, were saying, “Are we seeing that right? Did a plane just hit a tower?”

At the AGC office, Keenan found most of the staff gathered in an adjoining suite that had a clear view of the crash sites. “As soon as I walked in, somebody shoved a pair of binoculars into my hand and said, ‘You’ve got to see this.’ And you could see everything that was going on. The building was obviously on fire.”

Now the terrible meaning of the attacks was starting to sink in. Keenan can’t forget the desperation of a receptionist whose father worked at Windows on the World, the posh restaurant on the 107th floor of the North Tower.

The receptionist, according to Keenan, “was hysterical on the phone. She couldn’t get her father or mother, and that was one of the phones that was still working. She just left immediately. I know that her father couldn’t have made it out of Windows On The World.”

Fateful Choice Indeed

As it always does in disasters, chance had a say in who fell victim to the events of 9/11, and who didn’t. On that day, Randy Colahan’s decision to prioritize his voluntary role as a member of AGC may well have saved his life.

At the time, Colahan was a partner of Colahan-Saunders Corp., a commercial printer in Long Island City. He also chaired the trade association’s awards committee, which was to meet that morning in an office tower near Penn Station.

As a printer, says Colahan, “I did a lot of business in the Trade Center. I was in one of the Trade Center buildings each of seven work days before (9/11). I was actually scheduled to be there for a 9 o’clock meeting at 7 World Trade, but I had that meeting with AGC. We looked out just as the second plane hit.” (7 World Trade Center, set ablaze by debris falling from the North Tower, was the third building to be destroyed at Ground Zero as a result of the 9/11 attacks.)

By this time, an unprecedented mass exodus from lower Manhattan had begun. Retreating on foot, Donnelly saw what he describes as “complete chaos and panic” in the streets as dazed, ash-blanketed people emerged from the subways along the way.

A fighter plane screaming low over Third Avenue heightened the terror: “We had no idea who it was, whether it was one of our jets.” Donnelly hiked all the way north to the George Washington Bridge, hitched a ride across with a kindly stranger, and eventually made his way to his home at the time in Rockland County.

“I was one of the last cars to get out of the Midtown Tunnel before they closed it down,” Colahan says. On the loop to the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway on the Queens side, “all of these people had parked their cars and were taking pictures as the first tower came down. The second tower followed, and we could see the smoke from the top of our building.”

A Pageant of Pain and Woe

However majestic and iconic they may be, buildings remain inanimate objects whether they stand or fall. The only true measure of a catastrophe like 9/11 is the suffering of the human beings inside them. For printers in the vicinity of Ground Zero, scenes of human catastrophe were almost indescribable.

Worst of all to behold were the ordeals of the people who could find no way out of the Twin Towers as they burned. “It was surreal,” recalls Eric Tepfer, then a partner in CQS. He says he and his staff watched “with a sense of helplessness” as people trapped on floors being incinerated above the points of impact signaled frantically for help and then, all hope lost, hurled themselves to the pavement below.

Looking on during those final, agonizing moments, Tepfer says, “we were rooting for them. It was almost as if we knew them. Then watching them jump one by one – I’ll never forget that.”

Donnelly, likewise, can’t erase his mental image of one white-clad victim who held out to the limit of his endurance, beseeching rescue. “He was just there for so long, he tried so hard, and then he dropped. To this day, it still haunts me.”

On 9/11, printers bore witness to death in other, equally heartbreaking ways.

Moments after seeing the second plane hit, Kott found himself taking part in a conference call with a client and the client’s customer, a representative of Cantor Fitzgerald, whom they implored to evacuate that financial firm’s premises in the stricken North Tower. Kott says the Cantor Fitzgerald representative demurred, insisting that the situation was under control.

“Needless to say, you know what happened to the people who worked at Cantor Fitzgerald,” says Kott. Close to 700 of them – everyone who had reported to work at One World Trade Center that morning – died when the building came down.

Seared into Hort’s recollection of the day is an encounter with a tenant of his on the 11th floor of 627 Greenwich Street, a graphic designer whose boyfriend had become trapped in one of the towers. “She had just got off the phone with him, and I believe he had said, ‘I’m not going to get out.’ And indeed, he did not. That made it seem real, immediately,” Hort says.

‘Did Me in Completely’

Keenan spent the day making sure that her staff got safely out of Manhattan while she also tried, mostly without success, to determine the status of her members in the downtown printing district. Home again around midnight, she learned from television reports that FDNY chaplain Mychal Judge, her luncheon companion of the day before, was among the 343 firefighters lost in the department’s doomed effort to save the towers and their occupants.

“They said he was the first body they brought out, and I just lost it completely,” Keenan says. “Knowing that he was killed just really did me in completely that day.”

Throughout 9/11, printers also witnessed the plight of survivors who literally were left speechless by what they had gone through at Ground Zero. “People were walking up Varick Street and Sixth Avenue all covered with soot,” Tepfer recalls. There was an eerie silence. No one was talking, but it was a horrific scene. Everybody was stunned. Everything was in a daze.”

After sending their staff home, Kott and his general manager made their way to the street, where they watched “a huge white cloud” of smoke and cinder billowing northward from the crash sites. The two men purchased cases of water from a bodega on the corner of Hudson Street and began handing bottles to escapees as they staggered past, many in bloodstained clothing.

“It was scary,” says Kott, thinking in particular of one man to whom he gave water. “We though initially that he was bleeding, because his shirt was covered in blood. I looked at him and said, ‘Hopefully, that’s not yours.’ He said, ‘It’s not mine, it’s my neighbor’s.’ That image of this gentleman, I will never forget.”

Cashman also remembers the ghostly parade up Varick Street as survivors picked themselves out of the wreckage. “Everybody looked exactly the same, covered in gray soot.” He says he and his employees spent most of the rest of the afternoon offering the victims water, cell phone calls, bathroom access, and whatever other small comforts they could provide.

Next Morning, ‘a Very Weird Day’

As endless as the day must have seemed, night finally fell on 9/11 and the destruction it had wrought. The next morning, Cashman managed to return to his office after first attempting to donate blood at St. Vincent’s Hospital near 14th Street (only to be told that owing to the extreme fatality of the event, blood for transfusion into the living wasn’t going to be needed).

He remembers it as “a very weird day” emotionally, made odder still by a call from a customer who was “yelling at me because his package wasn’t going to get out via FedEx.” Hort had a similar experience. “The printing business is funny,” he says. “I had customers calling me the next morning and asking me, am I going to get my proofs today?”

In the ensuing days, 9/11 and its aftermath would come to mean different things to different printers.

No firm was hit harder than the Francis Emory Fitch Company on Liberty Street, located so close to the South Tower that its collapse obliterated the plant and everything it contained. Almost miraculously, according to a profile of the company published in a trade journal several years later, the company was delivering work to customers in two days with the help of other printers. It eventually re-equipped and found new quarters on West 28th Street, where the 135-year-old firm now does business as the Fitch Group.

Companies that were spared physical damage still had to contend with business loss, as many in the immediate vicinity couldn’t resume operations until the districts below Canal Street had been fully reopened to traffic. The difficulty then, according to Tepfer, was that printers could find little to produce in the wake of the attacks.

“There was no new business,” he says. “Anytime a customer would call, it would be to cancel a job. There was no interest on behalf of anyone to print. I would cringe every time the phone rang.”

“It was like the bottom dropped out of downtown, as far as printing goes,” Donnelly concurs.

Business was already slow; it became slower,” comments Keenan. “People didn’t have a lot of money, and they were really reluctant to part with their dollars unless they were absolutely assured of a 100% return. Nobody could assure that anywhere.”

Too Much to ‘Claw Back’

“The overall impact on the industry was devastating,” according to Kott. “It impacted my business immediately. We were closed for two weeks. There was no material damage, but there was a lot of financial damage. We lost between $100,000 and $200,000 worth of business.”

The loss, says Kott, was a reversal of fortune from which his small company never completely recovered. “Where do you claw back $100,000 to $200,000 worth of work?” he asks. “It just wasn’t there.” At the same time, some of his Manhattan-based clients were starting to move elsewhere, taking their jobs with them.

“It made it tough to continue,” acknowledges Kott, who sold the company in 2003 to focus on advocacy and fundraising for print industry education.

The cumulative effects of 9/11 and its aftermath took a toll both at CQS and among metro area printers in general, according to Tepfer. “It did bring a big change to the psychology of the people at the company,” he says. “Those who were extremely committed, stayed. Those who weren’t used this as a moment to say, ‘Hey, wait a second, I don’t know if this is coming back, if this is what I want to do, if I want to go on struggling like this.’”

Tepfer also points out that because so much of the printing produced in lower Manhattan was “Wall Street driven,” the loss of that business after 9/11 could not have been anything other than ruinous for many.

“That changed completely,” he says, citing a “shift in mindset” and a shunning of Manhattan that he compares with the depopulation of the borough’s central business district during COVID-19.

Once something like this occurs, Tepfer observes, “things never come back to the way they are.” He adds that CQS’s acquisition by HighRoad Press in 2004 “was a real outgrowth of what happened on September 11.”

Norm-Changing ‘Shock Waves’

“There have been a number of things in my history in printing where I found that you go through these shock waves, these big changes, and you see that business never gets back to the same,” says Colahan, citing the 2008-2009 recession and the present pandemic as examples.

“We had a very busy time in 2000 and 2001, and all of a sudden, it was such a dramatic change. Business moved away from offset. Business also moved away from having to be so close to Manhattan. It shifted to being more just-in-time printing, less inventory of material, so that you didn’t inventory something that could become obsolete.”

Printers also had to learn to rethink customer relationships, according to Colahan. He says that recovering from 9/11 meant “making more contacts – you’re not just relying on our existing clients for everything. Once you had a client, it used to be, if you didn’t screw up, you’d never lose them. That whole model changed.”

Others are less inclined to see 9/11 as an inflection point. In Hort’s opinion, 9/11 was not an all-transforming episode for Manhattan’s printing industry, but an acceleration of an upheaval it was already undergoing.

“There were too many printers on Canal Street and Hudson Street,” he explains. “There had to be some attrition. There was too much metal – too many people doing it.” The need for equipment and personnel was being reduced by the digitization of prepress and other kinds of automation, Hort adds. Beyond that, “there was a glut of capacity” that the area’s printers could never fully utilize with the volume of work available to them.

“9/11 is not why there isn’t much of a printing industry on Canal Street anymore,” Hort concludes. “For printers in lower Manhattan, the die was already cast.”

That squares with the view of consumables industry veteran Michael Brice, who was then supplying printers throughout the metropolitan area as an executive of Superior Printing Ink. “There was a trend anyway, prior to that, of facilities moving out of New York as it was too expensive to operate, and logistically it was tough. Obviously, with real estate becoming more valuable as lofts, residential, I think that was afoot already.”

“For some people that lived in New York, it might have given them some pause to do business in an epicenter like that, whereas they could be outside, with less interruption,” Brice continues. “I’m sure that entered some people’s minds, and maybe it pushed them over the edge. I think that the push to get out of New York for more space, lower costs, and other operating advantages was going on, and I don’t know whether (9/11 itself) had a major effect.”

‘Last Printer in Manhattan’

In 2008, in the throes of recession, Cosmos Communications moved to its present home in Long Island City despite having renewed a 10-year lease at 175 Varick Street.  Cashman doesn’t count the long-term impact of 9/11 as a factor in the decision.

“The industry was already in a moving cycle out of Manhattan,” he says, noting that the trend was driven in part by New York City programs aimed at relocating printers to the Brooklyn Army Terminal and other locales in the outer boroughs. “Our goal was to end up being one of the last printers in Manhattan.” Cosmos Communications hung on to that distinction, Cashman says, “until it became economically impossible to operate” where it was.

Despite everything, Manhattan still supports a printing industry, and many of those who remember its worst day from first-hand experience 20 years ago continue to work steadfastly in the trade. Some of them can mingle their harshest impressions of 9/11 with recollections of a more uplifting kind.

That day, Hallie Satz was struggling to get back to her business and her family from a trade show in Chicago after air travel across the nation had been grounded (see sidebar below). When she finally reached home, she detected solidarity as well as sadness in the hearts of her industry peers.

“In some ways, everyone was very unified,” she says. “That was a great thing, for a short period of time. You had all of this unity and camaraderie amongst the printers. Everyone was speaking with one another – that came out of it for a while. On the positive side, right after 9/11, all the printers were talking to each other.”

‘U.S.A, U.S.A.’

Cashman describes feeling another kind of unanimity “the next day, standing on the corner of Sixth Avenue and Houston Street with hundreds and hundreds of people, just cheering the firemen, the firetrucks, the emergency services, every truck that went by. We stood there for what seemed like hours, chanting ‘U.S.A., U.S.A.’ In some ways, it brought all of us closer together. It was a great effect of a horrible event.”

Both memories speak to the resilience of an industry whose history will always be entwined with the terrible events of 9/11. “I give great credit to the companies that did survive that whole thing,” Keenan says. “Because those people (had) the perseverance, patience, and just sheer will and determination that they were not going to lose their firms, that they were not going to go out of business.”

“You can’t intimidate a New Yorker or somebody from New Jersey,” Keenan declares. “I think that without that spirit, you wouldn’t even have an industry today.”

Sidebar: The Long Way Home

A printer didn’t need to be south of Canal Street on September 11, 2001 to see his or her life and business thrown into turmoil by the day’s deadly attacks. Hundreds of New York metro area printing personnel attending the Print 01 trade show in Chicago learned this the hard way as they found themselves abruptly cut off from their scheduled flights home.

Among them was Hallie Satz, currently president of HighRoad Press in Moonachie, N.J. At the time, she was president of the Barton Press division of EarthColor, a Parsippany, N.J. print network that is now part of Mittera Group. On the morning of 9/11, Satz and a large contingent of other EarthColor executives and managers were present at Print 01 for a panel discussion featuring Robert Kashan, their CEO.

Satz got the bad news at breakfast when her husband called to say, “A plane has hit the towers.” Initially, she recalls, reality had a hard time taking hold. “Everybody had a different idea. Some people were thinking it was just a fluke, or an accident. Others were saying no, no, no, this was an attack.” Her immediate thoughts were of her children at home in New Jersey, then 11, 10, and 8.

The panel presentation went on as scheduled, “but as Robert (Kashan) was speaking, the second plane crashed,” Satz says. By this point, the scene at the McCormick Place expo center was frantic, with cell phones dead, people dashing to their hotels, and everyone who didn’t live in the vicinity desperate to find a way out of Chicago.

The EarthColor group, 15 strong, found theirs in a pair of Winnebago vehicles that a member of the team managed to rent. Then began an eastward trek that Satz remembers with a mixture of discomfort and wry humor.

One of just two women in the group, she found herself sharing one of the vans with six men. “We had to go slow. They were not new Winnebagos. They were small,” says Satz, who sat cramped on a bench for the 36 hours the trip home would take. The behavior of her equally stressed traveling companions was sometimes less than cordial.

“You’re in this Winnebago with a lot of testosterone, a lot of fighting,” she says. “There was a lot of arguing going back and forth. I think they passed the time by fighting.”

Looking back at the day and its grim events 20 years later, Satz sums it up as “an instant change in life” that has some parallels with the disruption caused by the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. “COVID of course was nothing like that, and yet, I’ll say as a printer, it was the only other time things really changed for all of us in printing,” she says.

Satz adds that one trait of the industry remained constant throughout the chaos of 9/11 and its aftermath. In printing, she observes, “everyone has always helped each other out. I don’t think there’s ever been a time in any tragedy or natural disaster where printers weren’t willing to help each other.

Festive Franklin Event Returns to NYC on November 17

The industry’s social calendar will mark a long-overdue return to normal on November 17 with the celebration of the 68th Annual Franklin Event.

The event, a festive salute to the industry and its leading lights, had to be postponed last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. But, with indoor gatherings now possible to conduct safely, the program is ready to satisfy the pent-up demand for in-person socializing that the industry in the metro area has been obliged to put on hold for far too long.

The venue is the 101 Club, an elegant space located at 101 Park Avenue (at 40th Street) in Manhattan. The host is Printing Industries Alliance, the trade association for New York State, Northern New Jersey and Northwestern Pennsylvania. Proceeds will benefit the Print Drives America Foundation, an advocacy campaign that promotes the use of print.

For a good deal of its 69-year history, the Franklin Event spotlighted prominent honorees on the national stage who weren’t necessarily tied to the printing industry (although industry leaders also were recognized). In recent years, however, the emphasis has shifted entirely to print and graphic communications, with tributes reserved for those who have done the most to advance print both as a communications medium and as a business enterprise.

To be hailed for their singular achievements this year with the Print Drives America Franklin Award for Distinguished Service are Michael Duggal, CEO of Duggal Visual Solutions; and Thomas J. Quinlan, former CEO of LSC Communications and RR Donnelley & Sons. 

Duggal heads one of the industry’s most fully capable providers of visual imaging solutions. As an early adopter of advanced printing technologies, the New York City-based company has produced high-end work for museums, galleries, retail environments, and many other customers around the world. Last year, Duggal and his team made headlines by turning the company into a major manufacturer of personal protective equipment (PPE) for first responders and others in the metro area.

Thomas Quinlan has a long and distinguished record of executive leadership with some of the industry’s best-known firms. Besides his stints with LSC Communications and RR Donnelley, he has held senior management positions with Moore Wallace and World Color Press.

The presentation of Franklin Awards to Duggal and Quinlan will be the ceremonial high point of a party that begins at 6 p.m. and concludes with an on-site after-party to which all attendees will be invited. The cover charge – $6,500 for a sponsored table of eight, $3,500 for a table of four, and individual seats for $350 – includes cocktails, a sit-down dinner, and music provided by Jazz at Lincoln Center.

Besides its convivial aspect, the annual Franklin Event has always been associated with industry advancement, which it has supported by contributing its profits to scholarship funds, foundations, and other causes that benefit printers and their employees. This year, proceeds will be earmarked solely for Print Drives America, an initiative that aims at giving print a higher profile among the media by highlighting its effectiveness and ROI.

Companies and individuals wishing to help the cause can do so by purchasing sponsorships, which aren’t limited to tables. Details about sponsorship opportunities are available from Kim Tuzzo, Printing Industries Alliance, 716-691-3211, or ktuzzo@PIAlliance.org. Marty Maloney, executive vice president of Printing Industries Alliance and executive director of the Print Drives America Foundation, also has information. Contact him at 203-912-0804, m.maloney@bmcorp.com, or mmaloney@pialliance.org